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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID)
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The Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) was developed by the Nutrient Data Laboratory, in collaboration with the Office of Dietary Supplements at NIH and other federal agencies. The goals for the DSID project are:

  • determine reliable estimates of ingredient content in dietary supplement products
  • compare analytically derived levels of ingredients to labeled values, if available
  • support dietary intake assessments in research by providing analytical derived estimates of dietary supplement ingredient content
  • release and maintain a publicly available dietary supplement database

In 2015, analytically-derived national estimates of ingredient levels in 4 categories of dietary supplements were published in the third release of the DSID (DSID-3). Vitamin and mineral levels in adult, children's and non-prescription prenatal MVMs and fatty acid levels for ALA, EPA and DHA in omega-3 fatty acid supplements were reported. The analytically verified DSID estimates can be used to replace labeled levels for specific dietary supplement categories to improve the accuracy of ingredient intake assessment in public health studies.

The DSID project was initiated in 2004 with the identification of priority product categories and ingredients based on prevalence reports from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) and other national surveys. The highest priority category is multivitamin/minerals (MVMs), which are reported to be taken by 40% of survey respondents (2003-2006 NHANES; > 20 years old). Dietary supplement ingredients were prioritized for analysis based on public exposure, public health significance, research needs, and the availability of validated analytical methods and reference materials. For all DSID studies, representative supplement products are identified and sampled using statistical sampling plans. Samples are then analyzed by experienced laboratories and these data are statistically evaluated by ingredient.

A new Botanical Initiative to analyze ingredients in high consumption botanical dietary supplements is underway. The first botanicals to be analyzed are green tea and flavonoid- containing dietary supplements. Criteria for the products to be purchased, ingredients to be analyzed and methods for sample handling and analysis will be established from pilot studies.

DSID Publications and Presentations


Last Modified: 3/25/2015
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