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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Snack Smart

We are becoming a nation of grazers-one in five American meals is a snack. Snacks provide more than a quarter of the daily calories consumed by American children-that's a third more than 30 years ago.(more ...)

Phytonutrients are Good for Bone Health

What are Phytonutrients? The prefix “phyto-“ originated from the Greek word meaning plant. Phytonutrients sometimes referred to as phytochemicals, are a group of plant-based compounds that are believed to provide a wide range of health benefits to humans. (more ...)

A D-Lightful Vitamin

It has long been known that vitamin D is necessary for strong bones and teeth, but its health benefits also include lower risks for heart disease, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. These effects involve its essential roles in calcium absorption, bone metabolism and the expression of many genes-and most people don't get enough of this important vitamin. (more ...)

Improve your diet with a positive approach

Two-thirds of Americans are now either overweight or obese, which is driving diabetes, heart disease and cancer, and is fueling increases in U.S. health care costs. For example, diabetes now affects an estimated 10 percent of the U.S. population. (more ...)

Volunteers CAN make a Difference in U.S. Health Policy!

You remember us. The USDA-ARS Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center has been conducting cutting-edge human nutrition research since 1976. Odds are that you know someone who has volunteered for such studies, or you may have been a volunteer yourself. (more ...)

The Healthy Colors of Your Diet

Have you thought about the many colors of our foods? They catch our eye and add so much to the appeal of our meals - particularly fruits and vegetables. Research shows that the colors of our foods may also be related to the health benefits they provide. (more ...)

Calcium and vitamin D: Nutrients of concern for North Dakota adults

While it is clear that both calcium and vitamin D are important dietary essentials for good health, until recently there was insufficient scientific agreement on how much of each should be recommended.

That changed in November, when an expert panel of the Institute of Medicine of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences announced estimated recommended dietary allowances for these nutrients. Bone health was the major factor for setting the RDAs for calcium and vitamin D. (more ...)


Last Modified: 1/6/2012
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