Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Helping Corn-Based Plastics Take More Heat / September 1, 2010 / News from the USDA Agricultural Research Service
Read the magazine story to find out more.

Photo: Three researchers examine a more heat tolerant plastic made from corn. Link to photo information
Developing a more heat-tolerant biodegradable plastic is the goal of ARS research chemist William J. Orts (left) and his collaborators, Allison Flynn and Lennard Torres from Lapol, LLC, Santa Barbara, Calif. Click the image for more information about it.


For further reading

Helping Corn-Based Plastics Take More Heat

By Marcia Wood
September 1, 2010

Your favorite catsup or fruit juice might be "hot-filled" at the food-processing plant—that is, poured into its waiting container while the catsup or juice is still hot from pasteurization. Current containers made from corn-based plastics literally can't take the heat of hot-filling, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) chemist William J. Orts.

But Orts and a team of collaborators from Lapol, LLC, of Santa Barbara, Calif., hope to change that by making corn-derived plastics more heat-tolerant. Orts and Lapol co-investigators Allison Flynn and Lennard Torres are doing the work at the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Western Regional Research Center in Albany, Calif., where Orts leads the Bioproduct Chemistry and Engineering Research Unit. ARS is USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency.

By boosting the bioplastics' heat tolerance, the collaboration—under way since 2007—may broaden the range of applications for which corn-derived plastics could be used as an alternative to petroleum-based plastics.

Corn-based plastics are made by fermenting corn sugar to produce lactic acid. The lactic acid is used to form polylactic acid, or PLA, a bioplastic. The Albany team is developing a product known as a heat-deflection temperature modifier that would be blended with PLA to make it more heat-tolerant.

The modifier is more than 90 percent corn-based and is fully biodegradable. There currently are no commercially available heat-deflection temperature modifiers for PLA, according to Randall L. Smith, chief operating officer at Lapol. ARS and Lapol are seeking a patent for the invention.

Read more about this and other ARS corn research in the September 2010 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

Last Modified: 9/1/2010
Footer Content Back to Top of Page