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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

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Research Project: Genetic and Biochemical Mechanisms Determining Fresh Produce Quality and Storage Life

Location: Food Quality Laboratory

Project Number: 1245-43000-012-00
Project Type: Appropriated

Start Date: Jul 07, 2010
End Date: Jul 06, 2015

Objective:
The goal of this project is to facilitate development of new genetic lines of fruits and vegetables that are superior with respect to sensory quality, storage life, and betterment of human health by providing breeders with the knowledge and molecular tools they require. Research over the next 5 years will pursue the following two broad objectives: Objective 1) Determine molecular mechanisms governing natural and stress-induced deterioration of fresh produce quality during postharvest storage and shelf life; and Objective 2) Identify, clone, and manipulate key genes regulating accumulation or loss of phenylpropanoids and other health-beneficial secondary metabolites in stored whole and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables. The initial phase under objective 1 will aim to identify and clone both regulatory and metabolic genes potentially involved in ripening, senescence, and responses to stress (e.g. low temperature) in fresh fruits and vegetables. Primary focus will be on genes and encoded proteins regulated by calcium, which is known to retard senescence and mitigate certain stress disorders, and on genes/enzymes directly involved in degradation of cell membranes. Gene silencing and other molecular strategies will then be used to confirm the critical role of specific genes/enzymes in ripening, senescence, and stress responses. This will provide target genes for manipulation or germplasm screening to yield new lines of produce with extended storage life and resistance to stress disorders. Under objective 2 there will be two foci. The first is to identify and clone genes that can be manipulated to enhance accumulation, retention, and/or bioavailability of anthocyanins (red pigments) and other flavonoids in sweet cherry and strawberry. Dietary intake of this group of plant chemicals is known to confer protection against cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and stroke. The second pursuit under objective 2 will be to identify, clone, and manipulate key genes in biosynthesis of health-beneficial hydroxycinnamic acid conjugates in wild germplasm of eggplant and tomato that can be transferred to commercial lines to yield new functional foods.

Approach:
Immature green and breaker tomato fruit pericarp tissue discs will be dipped in 2% calcium chloride solution or water, and then frozen in liquid nitrogen 0–6 hours after treatment. Extracted total RNA will be hybridized to a gene chip for the tomato genome, and genome-wide expression profiles will be studied by microarray analysis. Major genes regulated by calcium will be determined by bioinformatic analysis and possible crosstalk with other signaling pathways. Expression patterns of selected key genes during all phases of fruit development, and in response to calcium treatment, will be studied using real-time RT-PCR. Gene expression in response to ethylene, phosphatidic acid, methyl jasmonate, chilling, and fungal elicitors will also be tested to find if there is interplay with calcium-regulated genes that control fruit ripening and senescence. Key calcium-regulated genes will be subjected to further functional studies. Primary focus will be on several genes/proteins already known to be regulated by Ca/calmodulin and believed to play roles in enhancement or loss of produce quality, including the novel transcription factor SR and phospholipase D (PLD) families. All SR genes in tomato will be isolated by screening a cDNA library using full length LeSR1 as a probe. Expression profiles will be determined for all LeSR and LePLDa family genes in response to various treatments by microarray analysis. The promoter of the apple a-farnesene synthase gene AFS1 will be analyzed for ethylene responsive elements (EREs) involved in ethylene-mediated activation. Promoter deletion fragment-GUS fusion constructs will be used in transformation studies to identify functional EREs. A yeast one-hybrid system will be used to screen a cDNA library for transcription factors that bind to AFS1 EREs. Five bioactive compounds identified by chemical genomic screening will be applied to mature fruiting sweet cherry trees, and the harvested ripe fruit evaluated for treatment effects on key quality attributes over time. Subtractive cloning methods will be used both to determine genes specifically associated with quality enhancement of strawberries treated with bioactive compounds, and to identify and isolate key genes involved in synthesis of nutraceutical hydroxycinnamic acid-polyamine amides in fruit of a wild eggplant relative. Ca/calmodulin regulation and the functions of UDP-glucosyltransferases related to synthesis and bioavailability of anthocyanins and flavonoids will be studied in strawberry fruit. Stable or transient transformation with silencing or over-expression gene constructs driven by constitutive or fruit-specific promoters will be used to assess the function of specific genes or gene families in various aspects of fruit physiology and metabolism, including ripening, senescence, responses to stress, and accumulation and/or retention of health-beneficial secondary metabolites from the phenylpropanoid pathway. Quality traits such as flavor, color, firmness, stress tolerance, and phytonutrient content will be analyzed in the transgenic lines.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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