Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Biology, Pathology, and Epidemiology of Emerging Oomycete Pathogens

Location: Foreign Disease-Weed Science

Project Number: 1920-22000-042-00
Project Type: Appropriated

Start Date: May 22, 2012
End Date: May 21, 2017

Objective:
1: Identify key components of the biology, pathology, and epidemiology of emerging oomycete pathogens as the basis for improved management strategies. 1A - Determine whether Phytophthora sp. inoculum levels on host plants and in soil are reduced by treatment with selected chemical and biological control agents. This sub-objective addresses the need for methods to remediate occurrences of P. ramorum in nurseries in both the Western and Eastern U.S. to allow continued operation of these nurseries. 1B - Improve methods for detection of Phytophthora sp. in soil and investigate physical and chemical factors that affect detection. This subobjective addresses requests from our APHIS partners for research addressing improved soil detection of P. ramorum and knowledge of detection limits and factors affecting detection. 1C - Determine key elements in spore germination and host infection by selected oomycete pathogens. For this subobjective, we are addressing additional key stakeholder priorities, including determining modes of seed transmission of P. ramorum, factors affecting chlamydospore germination, and studies on infectivity of P. kernoviae, P. pinifolia, and Sclerophthora rayssiae var. zeae.

Approach:
Using specialized containment facilities, we will obtain data in key research areas to assist in managing emerging oomycete pathogens including Phytophthora ramorum, P. kernoviae, P. pinifolia, and Sclerophthora rayssiae var. zeae. To address the need for methods to remediate occurrences of P. ramorum in nurseries in both the Western and Eastern U.S., we will use a novel root inoculation assay to measure the effects of selected chemicals and biological control agents on Phytophthora sp. inoculum levels on host plants and in soil. We will also develop baiting assays to improve methods for detection of Phytophthora sp. in soil and investigate physical and chemical factors that affect detection. We will use a variety of experimental approaches in specialized laboratory and greenhouse facilities to study chlamydospore germination and the potential for seed transmission of P. ramorum, as well as the infectivity of P. kernoviae, P. pinifolia, and Sclerophthora rayssiae var. zeae. Understanding key features of biology, pathology, and epidemiology of the selected pathogens will contribute to development of targeted management practices and recommendations.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page