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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Hatching Egg Sanitization for Prevention Or Reduction of Human Enteropathogens-a Review

Authors
item Berrang, Mark
item Cox, Nelson
item Frank, J. - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Buhr, Richard
item Bailey, Joseph

Submitted to: Applied Poultry Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 22, 1999
Publication Date: January 1, 2000
Citation: BERRANG, M.E., COX JR, N.A., FRANK, J.F., BUHR, R.J., BAILEY, J.S. HATCHING EGG SANITIZATION FOR PREVENTION OR REDUCTION OF HUMAN ENTEROPATHOGENS-A REVIEW. APPLIED POULTRY RESEARCH. 2000. V. 9 P. 279-284.

Interpretive Summary: Hatching eggs can be contaminated with bacteria that can make humans sick. These bacteria are spread to many chicks when the eggs hatch out in a commercial hatchery. This poses a significant problem because these bacteria are carried to the farm where broilers are grown and can then be found on the final food product, potentially causing foodborne disease outbreaks. It is possible to sanitize eggs, and the hatchery environment, to lessen the presence of human enteropathogens leaving on the newly hatched chicks. Many papers have been published on these subjects over the last 50 years. Unfortunately, many in the poultry industry do not have enough access to the scientific literature to make use of this information. This review is a concise collection of some of the most important and relevant research in the area of hatching egg sanitization in a format that can be readily applied by people in the poultry industry. This information can be used to guide producers and supervisors in the institution of an egg sanitization program.

Technical Abstract: Hatching egg sanitization has been a somewhat controversial issue for years. Many in the hatching egg industry have felt that it is a bad practice to wet a fertile egg. Nevertheless, a fair amount of research has been published on the problem of lowering bacterial contamination of hatching eggs without adversely affecting hatchability. As on farm and hatchery HACCP programs become a reality, more and more companies will become interested in how to best prevent colonization of chicks with human enteropathogens. It is possible to effectively lower bacterial contamination on the eggs, and in the hatching cabinet. Thereby, the human enteropathogen contamination being placed in grow houses with the chicks can be lessened. Information gleaned from early, as well as recent egg sanitizing efforts can be useful in designing the best overall egg and hatchery sanitization program.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014
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