Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Flagellin Short Variable Region (Svr) Sequence for Campylobacter Typing

Authors
item Meinersmann, Richard
item Stern, Norman
item Bailey, Joseph
item Cray, Paula
item Hiett, Kelli

Submitted to: Campylobacter Helicobacter and Related Organisms International Workshop
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 1999
Publication Date: September 12, 1999
Citation: MEINERSMANN, R.J., STERN, N.J., BAILEY, J.S., CRAY, P.J., HIETT, K.L. FLAGELLIN SHORT VARIABLE REGION (SVR) SEQUENCE FOR CAMPYLOBACTER TYPING. CAMPYLOBACTER HELICOBACTER AND RELATED ORGANISMS INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP. 1999.

Technical Abstract: Sequence based typing of a fragment of the flaA gene has been proposed for discriminating Campylobacter (Meinersmann et al. J. Clin. Micro. 1997;35:2810). This study was undertaken to examine the population genetics and to confirm the epidemiological validity of the test. Ninety-eight strains from 46 independent collections were blind coded along with 11 duplicates of these strains. The code was broken after multiple sequence analysis of 339 bp including the SVR was performed for these strains and the associations were interpreted. Nine of the duplicates were identical and two duplicates differed by 1 bp. Thirty-eight sequence-types were identified that were all epidemiologically relevant. There were two major groups. The members of the largest group (78 isolates) differed from each other by less than 8 % (<28 bp). The second group (20 isolates) differed from the first group by as much as 20 % and differed from each other by 14 % or less (48bp). No isolates from chickens from 24 independent sources were found in the second group. Twenty strains were collected from a single poultry farm. All of the strains collected within the poultry house on that farm had 2 or fewer base differences. Five strains from outside the houses at that farm differed by at least 3% from the house strains and were included in both major groups described above. The differences noted on the study farm could all be accounted for without invoking a hypothesis of recombination. If recombination does play a part in the generation of diversity of the SVR, it appears there must be an unidentified recombination barrier that separates sub-populations of Campylobacter.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page