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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Detection of Parasitized Fly Puparia by Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

Authors
item Dowell, Floyd
item Broce, Alberto - KSU, MANHATTAN, KS 66506
item Xie, Feng - KSU, MANHATTAN, KS 66506
item Throne, James
item Baker, James

Submitted to: Near Infrared Spectroscopy Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 11, 2000
Publication Date: September 1, 2000
Citation: Dowell, F.E., Broce, A.B., Xie, F., Throne, J.E., Baker, J.E. 2000. Detection of parasitized fly puparia by using near-infrared spectroscopy. Near Infrared Spectroscopy Journal. 8(4)259-265.

Interpretive Summary: Flies can carry diseases and annoy livestock to the point of reducing weight gain and performance. They reproduce rapidly and are difficult to control since they have developed insecticide resistance. Biological control of flies with parasitoids has been an effective means of reducing filth fly populations. However, commercial insectaries have no means to insure delivery of known amounts or parasitoids and need a rapid means of determining parasitization levels. We show near-infrared spectroscopy could be used to rapidly detect fly parasitoids. This technology, if coupled with an automated sorting device, could assist commercial insectaries in delivering known quantities of parasitized puparia for use in biological control of house flies and other filth flies, and in rapidly determining levels of parasitization of these flies in the field.

Technical Abstract: Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used to identify house fly (Musca domestica L.) puparia that contained viable parasitoids. Results derived from a partial least squares analysis of NIR spectra showed that about 80- 90% of puparia containing parasitoids could be correctly identified. Difference spectra and beta coefficients indicate that absorption differences between parasitized and unparasitized puparia may be due to moisture content and/or differences in composition of chitin or lipid components. Detection of viable hymenopterous parasitoids within puparia could assist commercial insectaries in delivering know quantities of parasitized puparia for use in biological control of house flies and other filth flies, and in rapidly determining levels of parasitization of these flies in confined livestock and poultry operations.

Last Modified: 11/22/2014
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