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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Influence of Oleic Acid on Populations of Campylobacter on Poultry Skin and in Vitro

Authors
item HINTON, JR., ARTHUR
item INGRAM, KIMBERLY

Submitted to: Poultry Science
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 16, 1999
Publication Date: August 11, 1999
Citation: HINTON JR, A., INGRAM, K.D. INFLUENCE OF OLEIC ACID ON POPULATIONS OF CAMPYLOBACTER ON POULTRY SKIN AND IN VITRO. POULTRY SCIENCE. 1999.

Technical Abstract: The ability of oleic acid to reduce the number of campylobacter on poultry skin and in vitro was examined. Skin was taken from poultry carcasses and washed in solutions of 0,2,4,6,8, or 10 percent oleic acid by blending in a stomacher. Oleic acid was decanted and skin was rinsed by stomaching in peptone water. Campylobacter was enumerated by plating the peptone water rinsates on Campylobacter Agar and counting the colonies present after incubation. Fewer campylobacter were recovered from rinsates of skin washed in oleic acid than from control samples. Also, fewer campylobacter were recovered from rinsates of poultry skin washed in higher concentrations of oleic acid than from skin washed in lower concentrations of the fatty acid. No campylobacter were recovered from rinsates of skin washed once in 10 percent oleic acid or twice in 4,6,8, or 10 percent oleic acid. There was no difference in the number of campylobacter recovered from rinsates of samples subjected to 1 wash or to 2 consecutive washes in the same concentration of oleic acid, however. Furthermore, no campylobacter were recovered from samples subjected to 2 consecutive washes in 10 percent oleic acid, blended in a Waring blender, and examined for the presence of the bacterium. Cultures of campylobacter were also suspended in solutions of 0,2,4,6,8, or 10 percent oleic acid and mixed for 5 min. Campylobacter was recovered from the culture suspended in the control tube; however, no campylobacter were recovered from cultures suspended in tubes containing 2 to 10 percent oleic acid. Findings indicate that oleic acid reduces the number of campylobacter on the skin of processed broilers and that the fatty acid is bactericidal towards campylobacter.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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