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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Carrots and Related Vegetable Umbelliferae

Authors
item Rubatzky, Vincent - DPT VEG CRP UNIV CA DAVIS
item Simon, Philipp
item Quiros, C - DPT VEG CRP UNIV CA DAVIS

Submitted to: Carrots and Related Vegetable Umbelliferae
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: May 16, 2000
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: This book was written with the intention to bring together background information relating to the history, descriptions, production and uses of carrots, celery and other umbelliferous vegetables. Although not a detailed production manual for each of these diverse crops, many principles and insights are included that can assist production practices, particularly for carrots and celery where the genetic and environmental factors influencing crop performance and procedures for optimum handling are fairly well developed. The influence of environmental factors on crop production are indicted and consideration to plant characteristics that affect performance ranging from seed germination to reproduction was given. References cited can lead those wishing for more detail to other sources of information and research. Beyond carrots and celery, the interesting diversity of these crops and their usage is presented many of which are very limited in production. This publication will foster a better understanding of carrots, celery, and related vegetables by growers and students of agriculture.

Technical Abstract: Umbellifers have received relatively little research attention compared with other vegetable species such as tomato, the brassicas, cucurbits and alliums. The umbelliferous vegetables are an interesting group of plants generally characterized by strong and unique flavour compounds, and in some cases providing important nutrients which can enrich the diet of consumers. For example, the nutritional value of the carrot is understated and unfortunately frequently is an under-utilized source of pro-vitamin A, especially in developing parts of the world in subtropical and tropical regions. Greater consumption of carrots and other umbellifer sources of carotenoids would measurably improve the health of many people who are presently deficient in vitamin A, as well as enhance the enjoyment of their meals. In general, this book on carrots or celery and one can usually assume that the information is relevant to other vegetable umbellifers.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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