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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Long-Term Snow Database, Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, Idaho, United States

Authors
item Marks, Daniel
item Cooley, Keith - ARS RETIRED
item Robertson, David
item Winstral, Adam

Submitted to: Water Resources Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 20, 2001
Publication Date: November 20, 2001
Citation: Marks, Danny, Cooley, Keith R., Robertson, David C., and Winstral, Adam. Long-term snow database, Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, Idaho, United States. Water Resources Research, v. 37, no. 11, p. 2835-2838.

Interpretive Summary: Snow is the dominant form of precipitation in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW). Annual average precipitation varies from 236mm at the driest lower elevation site, to more than 1100mm at the wettest site in the higher elevations. Based on dew point temperature during storms, 15-55 percent of the lower elevation precipitation falls as snow, and 60-90 percent of the higher elevation precipitation falls as snow. Water from snowmelt is critical to the ecosystems and resources in RCEW because the water stored in the seasonal snow cover is the primary source of spring and summer soil moisture and streamflow. Snow water equivalent (SWE) has been measured at eight locations in RCEW every two weeks throughout the snow season (Dec. 1 to June 1) for 35 water years (1962-1996). SWE was continuously monitored at one reference site for 14 water years (1983-1996). The measurement sites are described, the methods used are presented and discussed, and these data are summarized. A description of the files and instructions for accessing these data is given.

Technical Abstract: Snow is the dominant form of precipitation in the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW). Annual average precipitation varies from 236mm at the driest lower elevation site, to more than 1100mm at the wettest site in the higher elevations. Based on dew point temperature during storms, 15-55 percent of the lower elevation precipitation falls as snow, and 60-90 percent of the higher elevation precipitation falls as snow. Water from snowmelt is critical to the ecosystems and resources in RCEW because the water stored in the seasonal snow cover is the primary source of spring and summer soil moisture and streamflow. Snow water equivalent (SWE) has been measured at eight locations in RCEW every two weeks throughout the snow season (Dec. 1 to June 1) for 35 water years (1962-1996). SWE was continuously monitored at one reference site for 14 water years (1983-1996). The measurement sites are described, the methods used are presented and discussed, and these data are summarized. A description of the files and instructions for accessing these data is given.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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