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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Bactericidal Treatment of Hatching Eggs V: Efficacy of a Multiple Chemical Dip to Eliminate Salmonella from Hatching Eggs

Authors
item Cox, Nelson
item Berrang, Mark -
item Bailey, Joseph

Submitted to: Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 20, 2002
Publication Date: January 20, 2002
Citation: COX JR, N.A., BERRANG, M.E., BAILEY, J.S. BACTERICIDAL TREATMENT OF HATCHING EGGS V: EFFICACY OF A MULTIPLE CHEMICAL DIP TO ELIMINATE SALMONELLA FROM HATCHING EGGS. JOURNAL OF APPLIED POULTRY RESEARCH. 2002. 11:328-331.

Interpretive Summary: Chemicals are used in commercial hatcheries to decrease Salmonella contamination of fertile eggs. In this experiment, eggs were dipped up to three times in water, hydrogen peroxide, or phenol solution to determine if a multiple dip approach would be more effective than a single application. Eggs were artificially inoculated with Salmonella before eggs were treated. Multiple dips were more effective than single dips for both hydrogen peroxide and phenol but not water. Commercial integrated poultry operations could use this information to combat the problem of Salmonella contamination in their hatcheries.

Technical Abstract: In previous studies, immersion in hydrogen peroxide and phenol reduced Salmonella-positive eggs without depressing hatchability. This study was carried out to determine if three consecutive dips in a chemical was more effective than a single immersion to eliminate Salmonella from hatching eggs. Eggs were inoculated with a marker strain of Salmonella Typhimurium by submerging the egg in a solution containing low numbers (103) or high numbers (105) of the organism. After allowing the eggs to dry, they were immersed for one , two, and three minutes in a 1.4 % solution of hydrogen peroxide or a 0.39 % solution of phenol. With the low inoculation Salmonella were eliminated from an additional 21.7 % of the eggs when three dips were used compared to a single dip.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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