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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Surface Runoff Comparisons of Row-Crop, Pasture, Forest, and Cool-Season Grass Land-Use Practices Along Riparian Zones in Three Central Iowa Waterways

Authors
item Maiers, Richard - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Schultz, Richard - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Hinz, S - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Logsdon, Sally

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 9, 2000
Publication Date: November 9, 2000
Citation: MAIERS, R.P., SCHULTZ, R.C., HINZ, S.D., LOGSDON, S.D. SURFACE RUNOFF COMPARISONS OF ROW-CROP, PASTURE, FOREST, AND COOL-SEASON GRASS LAND-USE PRACTICES ALONG RIPARIAN ZONES IN THREE CENTRAL IOWA WATERWAYS. AGRONOMY ABSTRACTS. 2000. CD-ROM. MADISON, WI. ASA.

Technical Abstract: Land-use practices can influence the infiltration capacity of the soil. This study was conducted to determine the seasonal and annual surface runoff differences in four commonly found riparian vegetation types in the Coland soil series (Fine-loamy, mixed, mesic cumulic Endoaquoll) in central Iowa. To determine surface runoff rates and volumes, rainfall simulation (7cm/hr) was conducted in 168 plots in three watersheds from 1997 to 1999. Row-crop land-use practices had higher runoff rates than perennial vegetation both seasonally and annually. Pasture and cool season grasses showed the greatest amount of seasonal variability. Runoff rates were consistently low in forested sites. These results indicate that perennial vegetation can decrease surface runoff.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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