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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Survival of Salmonella Thphimurium on Sterile Ground Chicken Breast Patties after Washing with Salt and Phosphates and During Refrigerated and Frozen Storage

Authors
item Yoon, K - UMES
item Yoon, K - UMES
item Oscar, Thomas
item Oscar, Thomas

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science and Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 10, 2001
Publication Date: February 1, 2002
Citation: YOON, K.S., OSCAR, T.P. SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA THPHIMURIUM ON STERILE GROUND CHICKEN BREAST PATTIES AFTER WASHING WITH SALT AND PHOSPHATES AND DURING REFRIGERATED AND FROZEN STORAGE. JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 2002. V. 67(2). pg. 772-775.

Interpretive Summary: Chicken processors can lower the risk of Salmonella food poisoning by implementing intervention methods that reduce the levels and survival of pathogens on their products. Washing chicken with chemicals that are safe to eat, such as salt and phosphates (found in hot dogs), is one way that chicken processors can improve food safety. In the current study salt and three types of phosphate were found to reduce the levels and survival of Salmonella on chicken during refrigerated and frozen storage. The best chemical was TSP, one of the phosphate solutions tested.

Technical Abstract: This study investigated the effects of salt, trisodium phosphate (TSP), sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), and tetrapotassium pyrophosphate (TKPP) washes on removal of firmly attached Salmonella Typhimurium from sterile ground chicken breast patties, as well as on their injury and survival in a refrigerator, in a -20 C freezer, and after 3 freeze-thaw cycles. S. Typhimurium were grown on chicken patties at 20 C for 20 hours, washed and enumerated by plating on selective and nonselective media. Both salt and all phosphate washing significantly lowered the survival of S. Typhimurium without significant injury of S. Typhimurium on patties after refrigerated, frozen storage, and freeze-thaw cycles, irrespective of treatment. TSP was the most effective treatment for removing and inactivating S. Typhimurium on chicken patties.

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science and Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 10, 2001
Publication Date: February 1, 2002
Citation: YOON, K.S., OSCAR, T.P. SURVIVAL OF SALMONELLA THPHIMURIUM ON STERILE GROUND CHICKEN BREAST PATTIES AFTER WASHING WITH SALT AND PHOSPHATES AND DURING REFRIGERATED AND FROZEN STORAGE. JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. 2002. V. 67(2). pg. 772-775.

Interpretive Summary: Chicken processors can lower the risk of Salmonella food poisoning by implementing intervention methods that reduce the levels and survival of pathogens on their products. Washing chicken with chemicals that are safe to eat, such as salt and phosphates (found in hot dogs), is one way that chicken processors can improve food safety. In the current study salt and three types of phosphate were found to reduce the levels and survival of Salmonella on chicken during refrigerated and frozen storage. The best chemical was TSP, one of the phosphate solutions tested.

Technical Abstract: This study investigated the effects of salt, trisodium phosphate (TSP), sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP), and tetrapotassium pyrophosphate (TKPP) washes on removal of firmly attached Salmonella Typhimurium from sterile ground chicken breast patties, as well as on their injury and survival in a refrigerator, in a -20 C freezer, and after 3 freeze-thaw cycles. S. Typhimurium were grown on chicken patties at 20 C for 20 hours, washed and enumerated by plating on selective and nonselective media. Both salt and all phosphate washing significantly lowered the survival of S. Typhimurium without significant injury of S. Typhimurium on patties after refrigerated, frozen storage, and freeze-thaw cycles, irrespective of treatment. TSP was the most effective treatment for removing and inactivating S. Typhimurium on chicken patties.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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