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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Reflectance and Transmittance Spectrocopy Applied to Detecting Fumonisin Insingle Corn Kernels Infected with Fusarium Verticillioides

Authors
item DOWELL, FLOYD
item Pearson, Thomas
item Maghirang, Elizabeth - KSU, MANHATTAN, KS
item Xie, Feng - KSU, MANHATTAN, KS
item Wicklow, Donald

Submitted to: Cereal Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 17, 2001
Publication Date: March 1, 2002
Citation: Dowell, F.E.,Pearson, T.C., Maghirang, E.B., Xie, F., and Wicklow, D.T. 2002. Reflectance and transmittance spectrocopy applied to detecting fumonisin in single corn kernels infected with fusarium verticillioides. Cereal Chemistry. 79(2):222-226.

Interpretive Summary: Fumonisins, which are mycotoxins produced by the fungi Fusarium moniliforme, F. proliferatum, and other fusaria, can be found in corn throughout the world. Some fumonisins have been shown to have cancer-promoting activity in humans and animals. Thus, rapid screening of incoming corn for the presence of fumonisin could help reduce fumonisin levels in food and feed products. Reflectance and transmittance visible and near-infrared spectroscopy were used to detect fumonisin in single corn kernels. Kernels with greater than 100 ppm and less than 10ppm could be classed accurately as fumonisin positive or negative, respectively. Statistical analyses indicated that including near-infrared wavelengths in calibrations improved classifications, and some calibrations were improved by including visible wavelengths. Thus, the color and chemical constituents of the infected kernel contribute to classification models. These results show that this technology can be used to rapidly (<1 s/kernel) and nondestructively screen corn for the presence of fumonisin, and may be adaptable to on-line detection and sorting.

Technical Abstract: Reflectance and transmittance visible and near-infrared spectroscopy were used to detect fumonisin in single corn kernels infected with Fusarium verticillioides. Some fumonisins are considered to have cancer-promoting activity. Kernels with greater than 100 ppm and less than 10 ppm could be classed accurately as fumonisin positive or negative, respectively. Classification results were generally better for oriented kernels than for kernels that were randomly placed in the spectrometer viewing area. Generally, models based on reflectance spectra correctly classified more kernels than models based on transmittance spectra. Statistical analyses indicated that including near-infrared wavelengths in calibrations improved classifications, and some calibrations were improved by including visible wavelengths. Thus, the color and chemical constituents of the infected kernel contribute to classification models. These results show that this technology can be used to rapidly and nondestructively screen single corn kernels for the presence of fumonisin, and may be adaptable to on-line detection and sorting.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014
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