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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Long Term Runoff and Suspended Sediment Measurements Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in Southwest Idaho

Authors
item Pierson, Frederick
item Slaughter, C - UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO
item Hanson, Clayton

Submitted to: Federal Interagency Sedimentation Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 9, 2001
Publication Date: January 20, 2001
Citation: Pierson, Jr., Frederick B., Slaughter, C.W., Hanson, Clayton L., 2001, Long term runoff and suspended sediment measurements reynolds creek experimental watershed in southwest Idaho; Proceedings of the 7th Federal Interagency Sedimentation Conference: v99-v106.

Interpretive Summary: The Agricultural Research Service, Northwest Watershed Research Center (NWRC), has been measuring stream flow and suspended sediment within Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in southwest Idaho for nearly forty years. The RCEW stream flow and sedimentation program provides fundamental information for studying runoff-sediment relationships, sediment sources and the interactive effect of climate, vegetation, soils and land use on rangeland hydrology and erosion. Such data are particularly valuable for understanding the complex sediment generation processes during winter floods. Rain on snow and frozen soil conditions frequently cause flooding, accelerated erosion and property damage throughout the Northwestern United States. The NWRC has recently updated stream flow and suspended sediment records for all gauging stations within RCEW and made them available via the internet. These data are available to support research on runoff and sediment processes of rangeland systems.

Technical Abstract: The Agricultural Research Service, Northwest Watershed Research Center (NWRC), has been measuring stream flow and suspended sediment within Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (RCEW) in southwest Idaho for nearly forty years. The RCEW stream flow and sedimentation program provides fundamental information for studying runoff-sediment relationships, sediment sources and the interactive effect of climate, vegetation, soils and land use on rangeland hydrology and erosion. Such data are particularly valuable for understanding the complex sediment generation processes during winter floods. Rain on snow and frozen soil conditions frequently cause flooding, accelerated erosion and property damage throughout the Northwestern United States. The NWRC has recently updated stream flow and suspended sediment records for all gauging stations within RCEW and made them available via the internet. These data are available to support research on runoff and sediment processes of rangeland systems.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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