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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Those New Varieties-Another Years's Experience

Authors
item Love, Steve - UNIV OF IDAHO ABERDEEN
item Novy, Richard

Submitted to: Potato Grower
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 15, 1999
Publication Date: June 1, 2000
Citation: Love, S., Novy, R.G. 2000. Those new varieties-another years's experience. Potato Grower magazine, 29(1):34,36,38-39.

Interpretive Summary: The control of losses to diseases and pests of potato involves the combined use of certified seed, pesticides, cultural and storage management practices that minimize disease, and the use of cultivars with genetic resistance. There are approximately 225 wild relatives that carry genes conferring resistance to the diseases and pests that plague cultivated potato. Many of these genes have been utilized already in the improvement of potato, others are currently being incorporated, and others have yet to be discovered and utilized. For the potato breeder, the challenge is effectively combining disease resistance with the agronomic and processing characteristics necessary for the commercial acceptance of a new cultivar Traditional breeding has been successful in incorporating desirable traits from the wild species into cultivated potato, and will continue to be one of the most economic means of combining agronomic, processing, and disease resistance traits into a commercially-acceptable cultivar. Currently, molecular biology techniques can help remedy a weakness of a released cultivar. Traditional and molecular techniques complement each other well, making this an exciting period in the genetic improvement of potato.

Technical Abstract: The control of losses to diseases and pests of potato involves the combined use of certified seed, pesticides, cultural and storage management practices that minimize disease, and the use of cultivars with genetic resistance. There are approximately 225 wild relatives that carry genes conferring resistance to the diseases and pests that plague cultivated potato. Many of these genes have been utilized already in the improvement of potato, others are currently being incorporated, and others have yet to be discovered and utilized. For the potato breeder, the challenge is effectively combining disease resistance with the agronomic and processing characteristics necessary for the commercial acceptance of a new cultivar Traditional breeding has been successful in incorporating desirable traits from the wild species into cultivated potato, and will continue to be one of the most economic means of combining agronomic, processing, and disease resistance traits into a commercially-acceptable cultivar. Currently, molecular biology techniques can help remedy a weakness of a released cultivar. Traditional and molecular techniques complement each other well, making this an exciting period in the genetic improvement of potato.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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