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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Weedem: a User-Friendly Software Package for Predicting Annual Ryegrass and Wild Radish Emergence

Authors
item ARCHER, DAVID
item EKLUND, JAMES
item Walsh, Michael - UNIV OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA
item FORCELLA, FRANK

Submitted to: Australian Weed Science Society Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 13, 2002
Publication Date: September 13, 2002
Citation: ARCHER, D.W., EKLUND, J.J., WALSH, M., FORCELLA, F. WEEDEM: A USER-FRIENDLY SOFTWARE PACKAGE FOR PREDICTING ANNUAL RYEGRASS AND WILD RADISH EMERGENCE. JACOB, H.S., EDITOR. PLANT PROTECTION SOCIETY OF WA INC., MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA. PROCEEDINGS OF AUSTRALIAN WEED SCIENCE SOCIETY. 2002. P. 446-449.

Interpretive Summary: Timeliness is one of the most critical issues in weed management, particularly where weed control options are limited due to the development of herbicide resistant weeds. Weed control efforts that occur too early or too late are less effective and lead to wasted time and expense. Understanding the timing and extent of weed seedling emergence can improve timeliness of weed control efforts. WEEDEM is a software package designed to predict the timing of emergence for the two most troublesome weeds of southern Australian dryland cropping regions: annual ryegrass and wild radish. WEEDEM predicts emergence based on weather conditions supplied by the user. The software is targeted for use by farmers, farm advisors, and extension personnel. Consequently, it is designed to be user-friendly and to require minimal data inputs. WEEDEM is currently being tested in field locations across Australia. Plans are to modify WEEDEM as necessary and adapt the user interface based on feedback received. WEEDEM is expected to be used by farmers, farm advisors, and extension personnel across southern Australia in making weed control decisions, reducing weed control costs and reducing economic loss due to weeds. Lessons learned from the development of WEEDEM will also help improve WeedCast, the U.S. version of the model.

Technical Abstract: Timeliness is one of the most critical issues in weed management, particularly where weed control options are limited due to herbicide resistant weeds. Weed control efforts that occur too early or too late are less effective and lead to wasted time and expense. Understanding the timing and extent of weed seedling emergence can improve timeliness of weed control efforts. WEEDEM is an interactive software package designed to predict the timing of emergence for the two most troublesome weeds of southern Australian dryland cropping regions: annual ryegrass and wild radish. WEEDEM predicts emergence based on weather conditions supplied by the user for specific sites. The software is targeted for use by farmers, farm advisors, and extension personnel. Consequently, it is designed to be user-friendly and to require minimal data inputs. Values for daily rainfall and minimum and maximum air temperatures are required. Besides weather data, initial data inputs include previous crop residue type, tillage system, soil texture class, and a qualitative estimate of initial soil moisture content. An initial version of the model was developed in October 2000. It is currently being tested in field locations across Australia. Plans are to modify WEEDEM as necessary and adapt the user interface in accordance with desires of farmers, farm advisors, and extension personnel in southern Australia. WEEDEM is expected to be used by farmers, farm advisors, and extension personnel across southern Australia in making weed control decisions, reducing weed control costs and reducing economic loss due to weeds. WEEDEM is based on WeedCast, which is used to predict emergence of 17 weed species in the U.S. WEEDEM extends the methods used in WeedCast to Australian weeds and conditions.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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