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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Other Side of the Coin: the Protective Role of the Type 2(th2) Cytokines

Authors
item Finkelman, F - UNIV.CINCINNATI COLL.MED.
item Urban, Joseph

Submitted to: Journal of Allergy Clinical Immunology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 15, 2001
Publication Date: May 15, 2001
Citation: Finkelman, F., Urban Jr, J.F. The other side of the coin: the protective role of the type 2(th2) cytokines. Journal of Allergy Clinical Immunology. 107:772-780 (2001)

Interpretive Summary: Allergic responses to a variety of common allergens like ragweed pollen are considered a nuisance and therapeutic and prophylactic procedures to control the response are considered safe and necessary. However, the molecular basis for responses to allergens is similar to the basic mechanisms for protection against ectoparasites like fleas, ticks and mites, and endoparasites like gastrointestinal worms. These types of parasites are generally uncommon in developed countries of the world because of efficient public health procedures and adequate sanitation. However, caution should be exercised when agents to inhibit allergic responses are used because both endo- and ectoparasties are ubiquitous albeit at low levels in developed countries, and the induction of allergic responses tends to down-regulate other types of immune responses that are often expressed in certain disease states that are prevalent in developed countries such as inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes and arthritis. Studies that were intended to understand immune mechanisms related to protection against parasites has revealed a greater interaction between disease and responses to infectious agents than could have been imagined. This work provides a theoretical and mechanistic basis for further studies on the positive and negative aspects of regulating immune function.

Technical Abstract: Allergic responses to a variety of common allergens like ragweed pollen are considered a nuisance and therapeutic and prophylactic procedures to control the response are considered safe and necessary. However, the molecular basis for responses to allergens is similar to the basic mechanisms for protection against ectoparasites like fleas, ticks, mites, and endoparasites like gastrointestinal worms. These types of parasites are generally uncommon in developed countries of the world because of efficient public health procedures and adequate sanitation. However, caution should be exercised when agents to inhibit allergic responses are used because both endo- and ectoparasties are ubiquitous albeit at low levels in developed countries, and the induction of allergic responses tends to down-regulate other types of immune responses that are often expressed in certain disease states that are prevalent in developed countries such as inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes and arthritis. Studies that were intended to understand immune mechanisms related to protection against parasites has revealed a greater interaction between disease and responses to infectious agents than could have been imagined. This work provides a theoretical and mechanistic basis for further studies on the positive and negative aspects of regulating immune function.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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