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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Access to the Maize Genome: An Integrated Physical and Genetic Map

Authors
item Coe Jr, Edward
item Cone, K - UNIV OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA
item McMullen, Michael
item Chen, S - UNIV OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA
item Davis, G - UNIV OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA
item Gardiner, J - UNIV OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA
item Liscum, E - UNIV OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA
item ,
item Paterson, A - UNIV OF GEORGIA - ATHENS
item Sanchez-Villeda, H - UNIV OF MISSOURI-COLUMBIA

Submitted to: Plant Physiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 18, 2001
Publication Date: January 1, 2002
Citation: COE JR, E.H., CONE, K., MCMULLEN, M.D., CHEN, S., DAVIS, G., GARDINER, J., LISCUM, E., POLACCO, M.L., PATERSON , A., SANCHEZ-VILLEDA, H. ACCESS TO THE MAIZE GENOME: AN INTEGRATED PHYSICAL AND GENETIC MAP. PLANT PHYSIOLOGY. 2002. V. 128(1). P. 9-12.

Interpretive Summary: Crop plant research is poised to make revolutionary strides including: cloning target genes based on their function and/or their position in the genome; documenting all genes and their interplay; defining and exploring all the existing genetic diversity in a species; and using functional information and relationships of genes in closely related species to extrapolate gene function in crop plants. The challenge, however, is to develop a set of comprehensive and systematic resources to facilitate these research endeavors. Genomic resources in maize will undergird sequencing of the maize genome, and will complement and contribute to research in the cereals, other grasses, and other crop plants. This paper reports on the process of preparation of comprehensive and systematic genome resources for maize. Information from this study will be important to cereal grains research workers in advancing their efforts to use knowledge from genomics in maize improvement and to understand how to use knowledge from each of the cereals in improvement of each, by identification of gene functions comprehensively and by comparative genetic and physical mapping.

Technical Abstract: This paper reports on progress in preparing an integrated genetic and physical map. The strategy is to fingerprint bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) fragments and assemble the fragments in a deep-coverage resource, accompanied by pegging with markers to confirm and to intercalate the assembled contigs. The markers are being anchored to the genetic map insofar as feasible, using restriction fragment polymorphism markers (RFLPs), simple sequence repeats (SSRs), single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion-deletion polymorphisms (INDELs), miniature inverted- repeat transposable elements (MITEs) and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). Markers are being associated with BACs by hybridization on filters or by polymerase chain reactions with pooled BACs.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
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