Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Dry Bean Yields: Weed Control and Soil Moisture

Authors
item Webber, Charles
item Shrefler, James - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Horticulture Industries Show
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: January 31, 2002
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production is an alternative cropping option within the Southern Plains region with increasing production and market potential. There is limited information on the interaction of weed competition and soil moisture on dry bean seed yields and the yield components that determine seed yields. This research reports the results of the first year of a 2-yr study at Lane, OK to determine the effects of weed control (weed-free and Weedy-check) and soil moisture (irrigated and dryland) on dry bean yield components. In a 90 day growing season, April 24-July 23, 2001, black beans (cv. 'Black Knight') produced the greatest seed yields compared to navy (cv. 'Gryphon'), pink (cv. 'ISB 462'), and pinto (cv. 'Apache') beans across weed control and soil moisture levels. Although weed competition and soil moisture both significantly affected the dry bean yield components, and therefore the final seed yield, the influence of these treatments was different. Weed competition significantl reduced seed yields by 320 lb/a (27%) by adversely affecting three of the four yield components: pods/plant, weight per 100 seeds, and plant populations. Unlike the differences in weed control, irrigated beans did not have a significant difference between the number of pods/plant or plants/a compared to the dryland bean plants; but there was a difference in the number of seeds/pod. The field research on dry bean production will be used to gain a greater understanding of the mode of action of seed yield depression in dry beans and possible methods for adapting the cultural practices for this region to maximize dry bean seed yields.

Technical Abstract: Dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production is an alternative cropping option within the Southern Plains region with increasing production and market potential. Dry bean production systems research is needed to investigate the interaction of bean variety, weed control, and soil moisture on dry bean yield components. The first year of a two-year field study was conducted at Lane, Oklahoma, on a Bernow fine sandy loam, 0 - 3% slope. The research design was a randomized complete block with four dry bean varieties (black bean cv. 'Black Knight', navy bean cv. 'Gryphon', pink bean cv. 'ISB 462', and pinto bean cv. 'Apache'), two weed control levels (weed-free and weedy-check), two moisture levels (irrigated and dryland) and four replications. Black beans had significantly greater yields than the other three bean varieties. The greater seed yields for black beans were the result of significantly greater seeds/pod and plants/acre. Weed competition significantly reduced seed yields by 320 lb/a (27%) by adversely affecting three of the four yield components: pods/plant, weight per 100 seeds, and plant populations. Irrigated beans had significantly greater seed yield than the dryland beans as a result of significantly increasing the number of seeds/pod and producing larger, heavier seeds (g/100 seeds). This field research on dry bean production will be used to gain a greater understanding of the mode of action of seed yield depression in dry beans and possible methods for adapting the cultural practices for this region to maximize dry bean seed yields.

Last Modified: 11/1/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page