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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Synergism Between Insect Pathogens and Entomophagous Insects and Its Potential to Enhance Biological Control Efficacy

Author
item WRAIGHT, STEPHEN

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: January 14, 2002
Publication Date: January 5, 2003
Citation: WRAIGHT, S.P. SYNERGISM BETWEEN INSECT PATHOGENS AND ENTOMOPHAGOUS INSECTS AND ITS POTENTIAL TO ENHANCE BIOLOGICAL CONTROL EFFICACY. KOUL, O., DHALIWAL, G.S., EDITORS. TAYLOR & FRANCIS, LONDON. PREDATORS AND PARASITOIDS. 2003. P. 139-161.

Technical Abstract: Insect pathogenic microorganisms and beneficial parasitic and predatory insects represent extremely different life forms that have developed a remarkable diversity of mechanisms and strategies to successfully compete for their insect hosts. Interactions between pathogens and beneficial insects have been a major concern to biological control researchers for many years and have been the focus of numerous reviews. With justifiable emphasis on environmental safety, a great deal has been written on the real and potential negative interactions between these groups of natural enemies. However, a growing number of investigations of pathogen parasite/predator-host associations in laboratory, greenhouse, and field arenas is leading to identification of an equally great variety of interactions with positive and even synergistic effects on the capacity of these insect natural enemies to infect, parasitize or prey upon a single host population. The objective of this paper is to present an overview of the diverse positive interactions known to occur between pathogens and beneficial insects. An attempt is also made to clarify a number of inconsistencies in the applications of interaction terminology and methods of analysis that have long hindered communication between researchers in the fields of ecology and entomology. Studies of the myriad complex interactions between pathogens and beneficial insects are stimulating development of novel strategies for successful integration of these control agents for improved biological control.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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