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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: FERTILIZER PLACEMENT IN ANNUAL CROP DIRECT-SEEDED CANOLA

Authors
item Wilkins, Dale
item Wysocki, Don - OREGON STATE UNIV
item Siemens, Mark
item Ott, Sandy - OREGON STATE UNIV
item Correa, Robert
item Johlke, Tami

Submitted to: Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Annual Report
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: February 2, 2002
Publication Date: June 1, 2002
Citation: WILKINS, D.E., WYSOCKI, D., SIEMENS, M.C., OTT, S., CORREA, R.F., JOHLKE, T.R. FERTILIZER PLACEMENT IN ANNUAL CROP DIRECT-SEEDED CANOLA. COLUMBIA BASIN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT. P. 76-80. SR 1040. CORVALLIS, OREG.: OREG. STATE UNIV. AGRIC. EXP. STATION IN COOPERATION WITH USDA-ARS, PENDLETON, OREG. 2002.

Interpretive Summary: In the inland Pacific Northwest, no-till or direct seeded annual crop systems with broadleaf crops in the rotation such as canola have advantages for weed control, soil erosion control and improved soil organic matter content over the typical winter wheat/fallow systems. Placement of seed and fertilizer is critical when seeding canola. Canola seeds need to be placed at an appropriate depth where there is sufficient soil water for crop establishment but not too deep that the seedlings die before they emerge. Fertilizer placed too close to the seeds could be toxic to the young seedling but if placed too far from the roots the plants could not access the nutrients. Canola was direct-seeded in September following spring wheat in a field near Pendleton, Oregon. Comparisons were made among starter fertilizer placed with the seed, below and to the side of seed, no starter applied at seeding, and placing the full complement of fertilizer below and to the side of seed. These factors had a significant impact on yield with nearly a two-fold difference between the best and worst treatments. Placing the full complement of fertilizer to the side and below the seed provided the best stand establishment, winter survival, accumulated dry matter, and yield. The worst canola yield resulted from applying all the fertilizer in the spring, rather than at the time of seeding.

Technical Abstract: The effect of fertilizer amount and placement on stand establishment, plant growth, and yield in direct-seeded fall canola following spring wheat was evaluated in a field near Pendleton, Oregon. 'Ericka' canola was seeded on September 25. Comparisons were made among starter fertilizer (100 lb/acre of 16-20-0-14) placed with the seed, below and to the side of seed, no starter applied at seeding, and placing the full complement of fertilizer (100 lb/acre of 16-20-0-14 plus 160 lb/acre of 46-0-0) below and to the side of seed. These factors had a significant impact on yield with nearly a two-fold difference between the best and worst treatments. Placing the full complement of fertilizer to the side and below the seed provided the best stand establishment, winter survival, accumulated dry matter, and yield. The worst canola yield resulted from applying all the fertilizer in the spring, rather than at the time of seeding.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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