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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Short-Duration Pigeonpea - a Potential Grain and Forage for the Southern Plains

Authors
item Rao, Srinivas
item Phillips, William
item Mayeux Jr, Herman

Submitted to: Agronomy Society of America, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2002
Publication Date: November 12, 2002
Citation: RAO, S.C., PHILLIPS, W.A., MAYEUX JR, H.S. SHORT-DURATION PIGEONPEA - A POTENTIAL GRAIN AND FORAGE FOR THE SOUTHERN PLAINS. CD-ROM. Agronomy Society of America, Crop Science Society of America, Soil Science Society of America Meeting. 2002. Abstract No. C06-rao104920-Poster.

Interpretive Summary: Abstract only

Technical Abstract: Forage based livestock production systems occur extensively throughout the southern Great Plains (SPG). However, a period of limited forage availability occurs from late July to early November in the region. In semi-arid regions of Asia, pigeon-pea (Cajanus cajan L. Millsp) is grown for grain and as a summer forage crop. Little information is available concerning the use and management of pigeonpea in the SPG. A 3-year (1996 to 1998) field study was conducted to determine forage production patterns and grain yield and nutritive value of two short-duration pigeonpea ecotypes, Georgia-2 and ICPL 85010. Total biomass at final harvest in October was 12.6, 6.4, and 9.3 Mg/ha in 1996, 1997 and 1998, respectively. Seed yield also varied with year, ranging from 5.4 Mg/ha in 1996 to 1.2 Mg/ha in 1998. Nitrogen concentration and digestible dry matter at final harvest was 19 and 585 g/kg for the whole plant, 34 and 758 g/kg for leaves, and 9 and 420 g/kg for stems and 26 and 750 g/kg for seed, respectively. Short-duration pigeonpea cultivars evaluated in this study provided high quality forage and grain that could be used to fill the late-summer forage deficit period in forage-based livestock production system.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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