Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: STATUS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR GENOMICS RESEARCH WITH RAINBOW TROUT

Authors
item Overturf, Kenneth
item Rexroad, Caird
item Palti, Yniv
item Thorgaard, - WSU, PULLMAN, WA
item Buhler, - OSU, CORVALLIS, OR
item Bailey, - WSU, PULLMAN, WA
item Williams, - OSU, CORVALLIS, OR
item Kaattari, - COLLEGE WILLIAM&MARY,VA
item Hansen, - U OF ID, MOSCOW, ID
item Hardy, - U OF ID, MOSCOW, ID

Submitted to: Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 4, 2002
Publication Date: December 1, 2002
Citation: Overturf, K.E., Rexroad Iii, C.E., Palti, Y., Thorgaard, Buhler, Bailey, Williams, Kaattari, Hansen, Hardy 2002. Status and opportunities for genomics research with rainbow trout. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Bol 133, Issue 4 p. 609-646.

Interpretive Summary: Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are one of the most intensively studied fishes in a wide range of research areas. They are a member of the family Salmonidae native to the Pacific coast of North America and Russia, and have been widely introduced around the world in regions with water temperatures below 20 C. Considerable basic biological knowledge has developed about this species as an outgrowth of their widespread cultivation as a food and sport fish. It is without question that more is known about the physiology and phenotype of rainbow trout than any other fish species. They are the most experimentally tractable of the salmonid fishes and can thus serve as a surrogate for research needed in the economically important Atlantic salmon, and in the Pacific salmon species. These closely related species within the Oncorhynchus and Salmo genera have also been studied extensively, such that in the past 20 years these species have been associated with over 40,000 reports on their ecology, behavior, physiology and genetics, with rainbow trout specifically being used in half of these studies. The utility of acquired structural genomic information to understanding the physiology and life history of an organism will depend in part on the applicability of that organism as a model species for experimentation. Rainbow trout have been used as model research species for over a century, and detailed knowledge of their genetics, physiology, and ecology are available with which genomic information may be correlated.

Technical Abstract: Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are one of the most intensively studied fishes in a wide range of research areas. They are a member of the family Salmonidae native to the Pacific coast of North America and Russia, and have been widely introduced around the world in regions with water temperatures below 20 C. Considerable basic biological knowledge has developed about this species as an outgrowth of their widespread cultivation as a food and sport fish. It is without question that more is known about the physiology and phenotype of rainbow trout than any other fish species. They are the most experimentally tractable of the salmonid fishes and can thus serve as a surrogate for research needed in the economically important Atlantic salmon, and in the Pacific salmon species. The resources for effectively utilizing rainbow trout for genomic studies are being developed. Clonal lines of rainbow trout have recently been established using the chromosome set manipulation methods of androgenesis and gynogenesis which can be readily applied to trout. These lines provide the experimental uniformity and reference line benefits which been well-established for inbred lines of mice, and will provide opportunities for analysis and genetic dissection of traits as differences among the lines are identified and genetically characterized. BAC libraries based on two of these lines have also been prepared. Detailed genetic linkage maps are also developing for this species with one of the maps being based on a cross of two of the clonal lines. This review covers the areas of rainbow trout genetics, immunology, nutrition, carcinogenesis and toxicology, disease, and physiology.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page