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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Experimental Chlorate Preparations As Feed and Water Supplements: I. Effects on E. Coli Contamination of Beef Cattle

Authors
item Anderson, Robin
item Carr, Mandy - ANGELO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Miller, Rhonda - TX A&M UNIVERSITY
item Genovese, Kenneth
item Elder, Robert
item Callaway, Todd
item Edrington, Thomas
item Jung, Yong Soo
item Hume, Michael
item Beier, Ross

Submitted to: Beef Cattle Research in Texas
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: March 26, 2003
Publication Date: June 1, 2003
Citation: Anderson, R.C., Carr, M.A., Miller, R.K., Genovese, K.J., Elder, R.O., Callaway, T.R., Edrington, T.S., Jung, Y., Hume, M.E., Beier, R.C. 2003. Experimental chlorate preparations as feed and water supplements: I. Effects on E. coli contamination of beef cattle. In: 2002 Beef Cattle Research in Texas. College Station, TX: Texas A&M University. p. 13-17.

Interpretive Summary: The bovine gut is considered a reservoir for Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7, human pathogens that can compromise food safety. Consequently, strategies are sought to reduce their concentration in animals immediately before slaughter. An experiment conducted by USDA and Angelo State University researchers showed significant beneficial effects of feeding cattle an experimental chlorate preparation in reducing (by as much as 10 to 100-fold) gut concentrations and hide contamination at the rump by E. coli. In the experiment, 64 feedlot cattle were randomly assigned to one of eight different treatments where amounts of the experimental chlorate preparations ranging from 0 to 500 mg/kg body wt were given over a 1 to 5 day period. Results from the study also showed that administering chlorate preparations significantly reduced E. coli concentrations in the rumen of these animals, which can also be a reservoir of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7. Additionally, the study further showed that even at the highest treatment levels, the experimental chlorate preparations were safe for the animals and had no negative effect on carcass quality. This research may ultimately provide beef producers another tool to ensure continued production of the world's safest and highest quality meat products.

Technical Abstract: An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of administering experimental chlorate products in the feed and water on gut, hide and carcass concentrations of Escherichia coli and Salmonella. In the experiment, 64 feedlot cattle were randomly assigned to one of eight different treatments where amounts of the experimental chlorate preparations ranging from 0 to 0.05% of body wt were given over a 1 to 5 day period. Results from the study showed that administering the experimental chlorate preparations in the feed significantly reduced E. coli concentrations (by as much as 10 to 100-fold) in the gut and on the hide at the rump. The water treatment reduced by E. coli in the rumen of these animals, which can also be a reservoir of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7. Additionally, the study further showed that even at the highest treatment levels, the experimental chlorate preparations were safe for the animals and had no negative effect on carcass quality. While early in the development stage, this research may ultimately provide beef producers another tool to ensure continued production of high quality, wholesome, microbiologically safe meat products.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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