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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of Hessian fly resistant wheat germplasm line P921696

Authors
item Ohm, Herbert - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item Patterson, Fred - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item Ratcliffe, Roger - USDA-ARS-MWA
item Cambron, Sue
item Williams, Christie

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 30, 2004
Publication Date: November 1, 2004
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/41018
Citation: Ohm, H.W., Patterson, F.L., Ratcliffe, R.H., Cambron, S.E., Williams, C.E. 2004. Registration of Hessian fly resistant wheat germplasm line P921696. Crop Science.

Interpretive Summary: Wheat cultivars containing genes conferring resistance to the Hessian fly are relatively short lived because new resistance genes are overcome within about 10 years of cultivar release. For this reason new sources of resistance must constantly be under development. A new wheat gene conferring resistance to biotype L of the Hessian fly was transferred from durum wheat into bread wheat. Unlike some wheats, this new breeding line is not temperature sensitive; it expresses strong resistance over a range of temperatures. Wheat breeders, and ultimately farmers, will benefit from the availability of this new resistance gene. The gene is appropriate for deployment against biotype L Hessian fly populations throughout the Midwest as well as being effective against complex populations in the states of AR, TN, MD, NC, SC, GA and DE.

Technical Abstract: A new gene for resistance to biotype L of the Hessian fly, Mayetiola destructor (Say), was transferred from an accession of tetraploid durum wheat (CI3984), Triticum turgidum Desf., into hexaploid common wheat, T. aestivum L. Through backcrossing twice to the cultivar 'Newton' (CI17715), twice to 'Cardinal' (PI502973) followed by six generations of self-pollination, the resistance gene H31 was transferred from the durum donor into a line called P921696, a soft red winter wheat. Testing against Hessian fly populations throughout the Midwest and populations from the states of AR, TN, MD, NC, SC, GA and DE indicate that this new source of germplasm will offer temperature-stable resistance over a large geographic region.

Last Modified: 7/31/2014
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