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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Characteristics of Low-Fat Beef Patties Formulated with Carbohydrate Lipid Composites

Authors
item Garzon, Gloria - SELF EMPLOYED
item Mckeith, F - UNIVERISTY OF ILLINOIS
item Gooding, J - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Felker, Frederick
item Palmquist, Debra
item Brewer, M - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Submitted to: Journal of Food Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2003
Publication Date: June 1, 2003
Citation: GARZON, G.A., MCKEITH, F.K., GOODING, J.P., FELKER, F.C., PALMQUIST, D.E., BREWER, M.S. CHARACTERISTICS OF LOW-FAT BEEF PATTIES FORMULATED WITH CARBOHYDRATE LIPID COMPOSITES. JOURNAL OF FOOD SCIENCE. 2003. V. 68(6). p. 250-256.

Interpretive Summary: Starch-oil composites prepared by steam jet cooking represent a new technology being developed to expand food and industrial uses for agricultural commodities such as cornstarch and vegetable oils. Jet cooking high-amylose cornstarch combined with maltodextrins (starch derivatives) from different plant sources and canola oil results in a soft gel that can be used as a fat replacer in ground beef patties. Patties were prepared with lowfat (90% lean) ground beef supplemented with 10% of a starch-maltodextrin-oil composite gel. The addition of the composite increased the tenderness, juiciness, and cooking yield of the patties, with no negative flavor, texture, or color attributes. Gels of different firmness gave similar results. This study demonstrated the effectiveness of these composites as a partial fat replacer, and their use provides a means to incorporate fat-soluble flavor ingredients into higher quality, low-fat ground beef products.

Technical Abstract: Physical and sensory characteristics of low-fat (10%) ground beef patties containing three types of carbohydrate lipid composites (CLC) were compared to all-beef patties (10% and 20% fat). Composites were formulated as gels containing high amylose starch, maltodextrins from 3 plant sources, and canola oil. Patties containing 80% lean beef, 10% fat, and 10% CLC gel were designated CLC patties. CLC patties had increased moisture content, cooking yields and fat retention as compared to the 20% fat control. Cohesiveness of the low-fat patties decreased with incorporation of CLC. Beef flavor intensity of CLC patties did not differ from 10% and 20% fat all-beef patties. Use of CLC improved tenderness and juiciness in low-fat beef patties as compared to 10% fat control. Despite differences in the firmness of the CLC gels, patties made with CLC gels containing corn, potato, and tapioca maltodextrins had very similar physical and sensory characteristics. These results suggest that CLC gels perform well as a partial fat replacer in beef patties while providing flexibility in gel firmness selection.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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