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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Forage Yield and Nutrient Uptake of Warm-Season Annual Grasses in a Swine Effluent Spray Field

Authors
item MCLAUGHLIN, MICHAEL
item Fairbrother, Timothy
item Rowe, Dennis

Submitted to: Agronomy Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 20, 2004
Publication Date: November 1, 2004
Citation: McLaughlin, M.R., Fairbrother, T.E., Rowe, D.E. 2004. Forage yield and nutrient uptake of warm-season annual grasses in a swine effluent spray field. Agronomy Journal. 96:1516-1522.

Interpretive Summary: Five warm-season annual grasses were compared for forage yield and nutrient uptake on a swine effluent spray field with a high soil test level of phosphorus (P). The annual grasses were compared alongside bermudagrass in an experiment on a Brooksville silty clay soil. Annuals were browntop millet, pearl millet, sudangrass, sorghum-sudan, and crabgrass. In the first year (establishment year for bermudagrass) sorghum-sudan had the highest forage yield and P uptake. Sorghum-sudan forage yield and P uptake were equivalent to established bermudagrass. Sudangrass and pearl millet forage yields were equal to or lower than sorghum-sudan, but P uptake of pearl millet was not different, due to its high concentration of P. Browntop millet, and crabgrass forage yields and P uptake were less than half those of sorghum-sudan. Sorghum-sudan and pearl millet were higher in forage yield and P uptake than the other annuals in both years, were equal to established bermudagrass, and should be useful in nutrient management hay systems in the southeastern USA.

Technical Abstract: Five warm-season annual grasses were compared for dry matter (DM) yield and nutrient uptake on a swine (Sus scrofa domesticus) effluent spray field. The annual grasses were compared alongside bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] in an experiment on a Brooksville silty clay (fine, montmorillonitic, thermic Aquic Chromuderts). Annuals were browntop millet [Panicum ramosum (L.) Stapf in Prain], pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R. Br.], sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], sorghum-sudan, [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], and crabgrass [Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop.]. In the first year (establishment year for bermudagrass) sorghum-sudan had the highest DM yield (18.9 Mg ha-1) and P uptake (50.3 kg ha-1). Sorghum-sudan DM yield (20.6 Mg ha-1) and P uptake (56.3 kg ha-1) were equivalent to established bermudagrass (21.3 Mg ha-1 and 56.1 kg ha-1, respectively). Sudangrass and pearl millet DM yields (17.4 and 15.7 Mg ha-1, respectively) were equal to or lower than sorghum-sudan, but P uptake of pearl millet (49.5 kg ha-1) was not different, due to its high concentration of P (3.2 g kg-1). Browntop millet and crabgrass DM yields, and P uptake were less than half those of sorghum-sudan. Sorghum-sudan and pearl millet were better in DM yield and P uptake than the other annuals in both years, were equal to established bermudagrass and should be useful in nutrient management hay systems in the southeastern USA.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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