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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Detection and Use of Quantitative Trait Loci (Qtl) for Carcass Composition and Meat Quality in Beef Cattle.

Author
item Casas, Eduardo

Submitted to: Genética Y Genómica Animal En Línea/Animal Genetics and Genomics Online
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 28, 2003
Publication Date: April 4, 2003
Citation: Casas, E. Detection and use of quantitative trait loci (qtl) for carcass composition and meat quality in beef cattle.. Genética Y Genómica Animal En Línea/Animal Genetics and Genomics Online. Never published.

Interpretive Summary: The objective of this review was to describe the process used to identify the position in the genetic material where genes are located (known as a quantitative trait loci or QTL). Identification of these regions allows the selection of candidate genes. These genes may be responsible for differences between animals with high and low productivity. The manuscript includes a brief description of the two strategies used to detect these regions on the chromosomes and a comparison is made between both. Pros and cons of both strategies are discussed. A description of the bovine families used at the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center to detect the regions where the genes that influence economically important traits is included. Updated results of the search for these regions and discussion of relevant results are included.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this review was to describe the most relevant quantitative trait loci (QTL) detected for carcass composition and meat quality traits in beef cattle. Searches for QTL have been based on the use of molecular markers, mainly, microsatellite markers. There are two strategies to detect QTL: one is the candidate gene approach and the other is the genomic scan. The latter has been the most commonly used because it requires no previous knowledge of the physiology of the trait. Eleven chromosomes have been found to harbor QTL for carcass composition and meat quality traits; however, those on chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 29 are the most relevant. Further studies are needed in outbred populations to establish whether they are segregating and determine their use.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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