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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Water Management and Hydraulic Structures in Antiquity, Contributions by Gunther Garbrecht

Authors
item GARBRECHT, JURGEN
item Fahlbusch, Henning - UNIV. OF LUEBECK

Submitted to: American Society of Civil Engineers
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: February 25, 2003
Publication Date: November 17, 2003
Citation: Garbrecht, J.D., Fahlbusch, H. Water Management and Hydraulic Structures in Antiquity: Congributions by Gunther Garbrecht. Brown, G.O., Garbrecht, J.D., Hager, W.H., editors. American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, Va. Henry P. G. Darcy and Other Pioneers in Hydraulics: Contributions in Celebration of the 200th Birthday of Henry Philibert Gaspard Darcy. 2003. p. 116-139.

Interpretive Summary: This article recognizes Dr. G. Garbrecht for his contributions to the history of hydraulic engineering. His most important work concentrated on the water supply system of the ancient city of Pergamon, Turkey. Additional excavations, surveys, reconnaissance and investigations of ancient water supply and irrigation systems were carried out in Egypt, Israel, Syria, Eastern Anatolia and Italy. A summary of four of these investigations is presented in this article. Dr. G. Garbrecht attached great importance to an interdisciplinary treatment of the water supply problem by expanding on and including hydro-technological, archaeological, and construction aspects into the studies. It may be rightfully claimed that the work led by Dr. G. Garbrecht not only increased our knowledge in the field of water resources development in antiquity, but also emphasized the absolute necessity of a real interdisciplinary approach in archaeological research.

Technical Abstract: Between 1967 and 1991, Dr. G. Garbrecht and collaborators investigated ancient hydraulic structures in the Eastern Mediterranean. Four of these investigations are summarized herein. Related field campaigns were conducted during the academic off-season and involved a mix of scientists, engineers, archaeologists and architects to allow for an interdisciplinary interpretation of the findings. Dr. G. Garbrecht secured grants from archaeological institutions and universities, and relied on personal contacts in the host countries to interact with authorities and obtain local assistance. The investigations uncovered, even by today's standards, bold designs and planning of water resources systems, technical brilliance, grandiose architecture, and high-quality craftsmanship in the construction of the structures. It may be rightfully claimed that this work led by Dr. G. Garbrecht not only increased our knowledge in the field of water resources development in antiquity, but also emphasized the absolute necessity of a real interdisciplinary approach in archaeological research.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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