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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Source of Resistance to Fumonisin Accumulation in Grain and Fusarium Ear and Kernel Rot of Corn

Authors
item Clements, Michael
item MARAGOS, CHRIS
item Pataky, J - UNIV OF ILLINOIS
item White, D - UNIV OF ILLINOIS

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 10, 2003
Publication Date: February 1, 2004
Citation: Clements, M.J., Maragos, C.M., Pataky, J.K., White, D.G. 2004. Sources of resistance to Fumonisin accumulation in grain and Fusarium ear and kernel rot of corn. Phytopathology. 94:251-260.

Interpretive Summary: A group of toxic compounds known as the fumonisins are associated with the disease Fusarium ear rot of corn (Zea mays L). Fumonisins contribute to potentially serious health disorders in several animal species, and may be associated with certain health disorders in human populations where corn is a major component of the diet. Because the public is generally unaware of fumonisin, and federal guidelines do not yet regulate its presence in food or feed, there is little information available on minimizing the concentration of fumonisin in corn grain through disease resistance. Resistance will provide producers and consumers with environmentally sound, economical control of fumonisins. Information on corn inbreds with a high level of resistance to fumonisin accumulation in grain is not available to the public. The objective of this study was to evaluate a genetically diverse collection of inbreds as potential sources of resistance to fumonisin accumulation in grain and Fusarium ear and kernel rot when crossed with a widely used commercial corn line. Hybrids developed from crosses of 1589 and 1030 inbreds were evaluated in inoculated and naturally infected trials in 2000. Thirty-five hybrids with fumonisin concentration in grain <5µ/g in both trials were selected. Inbreds from which these hybrids were produced included yellow, white and red kernelled lines; flint and dent lines; and early through late maturing lines. In 2001, low fumonisin concentration in grain and low ear rot severity were associated with several of the hybrids and their distinct, advanced generations. This suggests that several dominant genes are involved in resistance, and that resistance from these inbreds can be incorporated into commercial hybrids.

Technical Abstract: Fumonisins are mycotoxins produced by several species of Fusarium Link. Fumonisins have been associated with Fusarium ear and kernel rot of corn (Zea mays L.) and several toxicoses of animals and humans. Corn inbreds with a high level of resistance to fumonisin accumulation in grain have not been identified. The objective of this study was to evaluate a genetically diverse collection of inbreds as potential sources of resistance to fumonisin accumulation in grain and Fusarium ear and kernel rot when crossed with a commercial 'B73-type' line. F1 hybrids developed from crosses of 1589 and 1030 inbreds and the inbred FR1064 were evaluated in inoculated and naturally infected trials in 2000. Thirty-five F1 hybrids with fumonisin concentration in grain less than or equal to 5ug/g at both locations were selected. Inbreds from which these 35 F1 hybrids were produced included yellow, white and red kernelled lines; flint and dent lines; and early through late maturing lines. In 2001, low fumonisin concentration in grain and low ear rot severity were associated with several of the F1 hybrids and their distinct F2, and backcross to FR1064 generations. This suggests that several dominant genes are involved in resistance, and that alleles for resistance from these inbreds can be transferred to FR1064.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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