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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Prevalence of Antibodies to Neospora Caninum in Dogs from Amazon, Brazil

Authors
item Canon-Franco, W - UNIVERSIDADE DE SAO PAULO
item Bergamaschi, D - FACULDADE SAUDE PUBLICA
item Labruna, M - UNIVERSIDADE DE SAO PAULO
item Camargo, L - INST CIENCIAS BIOMEDICAS
item Souza, S - UNIVERSIDADE DE SAO PAULO
item Silva, J - UNIVERSIDADE DE SAO PAULO
item Pinter, A - UNIVERSIDADE DE SAO PAULO
item Dubey, Jitender
item Gennari, S - UNIVERSIDADE DE SAO PAULO

Submitted to: Veterinary Parasitology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 6, 2003
Publication Date: June 7, 2003
Citation: Canon-Franco, W.A., Bergamaschi, D.P., Labruna, M.B., Camargo, L.M., Souza, S.L., Silva, J.C., Pinter, A., Dubey, J.P., Gennari, S.M. 2003. Prevalence of antibodies to neospora caninum in dogs from amazon, brazil. Veterinary Parasitology. 115:71-74.

Interpretive Summary: Neospora caninum is a single-celled parasite. It causes abortion in livestock and paralysis in companion animals. It is the most important cause of abortion in dairy cattle worldwide. Scientists at the Beltsville Agricultural Research Center and the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil have found Neospora infections in dogs in Amazon, Brazil indicating that this disease is present even in remote parts of the world. These findings will be of interest to biologists, parasitologists and veterinarians.

Technical Abstract: Neospora caninum is an important cause of abortion in dairy cattle worldwide. Dogs are important in the epidemiology of this parasite because they are the only hosts known to excrete N. caninum oocysts. Antibodies to N. caninum were assayed in serum samples from 157 dogs from Monte Negro, Rondônia, Amazon, Brazil using the indirect fluorescent antibody test. Antibodies to N. caninum were found in 13 of 157 (8.3%) dogs in titers of 1:50 in 1, 1:100 in 2, 1:200 in 5, 1:800 in 1, 1:1600 in 2, and 1:3200 in 2 dogs. These data indicate that N. caninum infection is prevalent even in remote areas of the Amazon.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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