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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of Soybean Plant Introductions from China for Resistance to Brown Stem Rot

Authors
item Patzoldt, Megan - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS
item Chen, Weidong
item Diers, B - UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Submitted to: Plant Health Progress
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 12, 2003
Publication Date: July 2, 2003
Citation: PATZOLDT, M.E., CHEN, W., DIERS, B.W. EVALUATION OF SOYBEAN PLANT INTRODUCTIONS FROM CHINA FOR RESISTANCE TO BROWN STEM ROT. PLANT HEALTH PROGRESS. doi:10.1094/PHP-2003-0702-01-RS. 2003.

Interpretive Summary: Brown stem rot of soybean caused by the fungal pathogen Phialophora gregata is an important disease in the Midwestern United States. Management of this disease mainly rely on planting resistant cultivars and cultural practices such as rotation. Resistance sources are very limited and new resistance sources are needed to increase resistance in soybean cultivars. This study, using two biotypes of the pathogen discovered in recent years, identified ten new accessions from a recent collection of 623 accessions collected from central China. The new sources provide BSR resistance that was equal to or greater than the currenet resistance sources, and will be employed in future soybean breeding programs.

Technical Abstract: A new set of soybean accessions from soth central China were added to the USDA germplasm collection in 1996. Previous studies have shown that accessions with high levels of resistance to brown stem rot (BSR) can be found in germplasm collected from Central and South China. The objective of this study was to screen these accessions and identify those with resistance to BSR . In a preliminary study, 85 of 623 accessions tested were identified as resistance to BSR. In the second study, these 85 accessions were challenged with multiple biotypes of P. gregata to identify those with strongest resistance. From those two studies, ten accessions were identified that had BSR resistance, which was equal to or greater than the current resistance sources.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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