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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Growth Performance of Stocker Steers Grazing Bermudagrass

Authors
item Looper, Michael
item Rosenkrans Jr, Charles - UNIV OF ARKANSAS
item Aiken, Glen
item May, J - UNIV OF ARKANSAS

Submitted to: Arkansas Experiment Station Research Series
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: June 25, 2003
Publication Date: December 1, 2003
Citation: LOOPER, M.L., ROSENKRANS JR, C.F., AIKEN, G.E., MAY, J.A. 2003. GROWTH PERFORMANCE OF STOCKER STEERS GRAZING BERMUDAGRASS. ARKANSAS EXPERIMENT STATION RESEARCH SERIES. 509:102-104.

Interpretive Summary: Stocker steer operations are regaining popularity throughout the Southeast. Increased production efficiency of the stocker enterprise is necessary to increase profitability. Supplementation and steroid implantation of steers increased average daily gain and altered lactate dehydrogenase activity. Altered lactate dehydrogenase activity may be one mechanism by which supplementation and steroid implantation improved steer performance. This information is of interest to beef producers, extension personnel, and agricultural professionals who advise beef producers on beef management practices.

Technical Abstract: The transition period from non-lactating to lactating in dairy cattle is too often unsuccessful. Body temperatures were monitored and metabolic disorders identified in Holstein cows. Cows with fever were orally administered a regiment of four aspirin boluses and one probiotic supplement. This non-antibiotic treatment prevented the recurrence of fever during the first seven days after calving in older cows but not first-calf cows. Fever and metabolic disorders during the first seven days after calving decreased milk production and reduced pregnancy rates in Holstein cows. This information is of interest to extension personnel, dairy consultants, and dairy producers.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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