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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Primitive Accession Germplasm by Cultivar Crosses As Sources for Cotton Improvement I: Phenotypic Values and Variance Components

Authors
item McCarty, Jack
item Jenkins, Johnie
item Wu, Jixiang - MISS STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 30, 2003
Publication Date: June 1, 2004
Citation: McCarty Jr., J.C., Jenkins, J.N., Wu, J. 2004. Primitive accession derived germplasm by cultivar crosses as sources for cotton improvement: I. Phenotypic values and variance components. Crop Science. 44:1226-1230.

Interpretive Summary: Cotton is grown primarily for its spinnable fibers. Fiber quality and yield must be improved to meet producer and consumer demands. This study was conducted to compare yield and fiber quality when exotic lines were crossed to commercial cultivars. Fourteen germplasm lines derived from selected primitive accessions with high fiber strength were crossed as male parents to each of five cultivars. The parents and second generation progeny were grown at two field locations in 1998 and 1999. Parents and third generation progeny were tested in 2000. Parents and progeny were evaluated for yield, yield components, and fiber quality traits. An additive-dominance, additive by additive and genotype by environment interaction genetic model was used for the data analysis. Genetic variance components were estimated based on results of the model. Cultivars had higher yields and lint percentages than germplasm lines. Fiber strength for germplasm lines exceeded cultivars. Lint percentage, boll size, micronaire, elongation, and fiber length were similar between second and third generation progeny. Additive and additive by additive epistasis effects were significant for all agronomic and most fiber traits. Significant dominance effects were detected for all traits except fiber elongation. Additive by environment and dominance by environment interaction effects were also detected for most traits. Additive effects were relatively constant across different environments for all traits studied, while dominance effects were sensitive across environments for cotton yield, fiber micronaire, elongation, and strength. This study will contribute to the understanding and use of primitive cotton germplasm.

Technical Abstract: Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., is grown primarily for its spinnable fibers. To meet textile mill requirements and producer demands, both fiber quality and yield must be improved. This study was conducted to compare yield and fiber quality when exotic lines were crossed to cultivars. Fourteen germplasm lines derived from selected primitive accessions with high fiber strength were crossed as male parents to each of five cultivars. The F2 hybrids and parents were grown at two different field locations in 1998 and 1999. Parents and F3's were grown at two locations in 2000. Hybrids and parents were evaluated for yield, yield components, and fiber quality traits. Combination of location and year was considered as environment for data analyses. An additive-dominance additive by additive (ADAA) and genotype by environment interaction genetic model was employed for the data analysis. A mixed model, minimum norm quadratic unbiased estimation approach was used to estimate genetic variance components based on results of the ADAA model. Cultivars had higher yields and lint percentages than germplasm lines. Fiber strength for germplasm lines exceeded cultivars. Lint percentage, boll size, micronaire, elongation, and fiber length were similar between F2 and F3 hybrids and near mid-parent values. Both additive and additive by additive (AA) epistasis effects significantly controlled all agronomic and most fiber traits. Significant dominance effects were detected for all traits except fiber elongation. Additive by environment and dominance by environment interaction effects were detected for most traits. Significant AA by environment interaction effects were detected for agronomic traits but not fiber traits. Additive effects were relatively constant across different environments for all traits studied, while dominance effects were variable across environments for cotton yield, fiber micronaire, elongation, and strength.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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