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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Planting Location on Survival and Growth of Booth's Willow Plantings

Authors
item Lowson, Katherine - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item Buckhouse, John - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item Stringham, Tamzen - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item Boyd, Chad

Submitted to: Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research Center
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 1, 2003
Publication Date: July 1, 2003
Citation: LOWSON, K., BUCKHOUSE, J.C., STRINGHAM, T., BOYD, C.S. EFFECTS OF PLANTING LOCATION ON SURVIVAL AND GROWTH OF BOOTH'S WILLOW PLANTINGS. EASTERN OREGON AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER. 2003. RANGE SCIENCE SERIES REPORT #6. P. 19-24.

Interpretive Summary: Willows (Salix sp.) are an important plant species for maintaining function (e.g. streambank stability, fish habitat, moderating solar inputs) in many riparian systems. Re-establishment of willows in depleted communities is dependent on an adequate knowledge of the environmental factors necessary for growth and survival of willow cuttings. Our objectives were to determine the influence of 1.) morphological location (point bar vs. floodplain) of planting, and 2.) soil moisture content, on growth and survival of willow cuttings. The study area was located along a Rosgen C-type channel located in a mid-elevation meadow system in Grant County, Oregon. The only willows on site prior to our study were scattered, old willow clumps with very limited annual production. Willow cuttings were planted within 12, 25 x 12m grazing exclosures constructed along inside turns within the study reach. Cuttings were taken from mature Booth's willow shrubs in April of 2002 and placed in cold storage (0oC) for 30 days. Cuttings were removed from cold storage and soaked in water for 2 days prior to planting in early May. Forty cuttings were planted to a depth of 40cm at both the floodplain and point bar locations within each exclosure. Survival of cuttings was assessed in June and August of 2002. Gravimetric soil moisture at 15 and 30cm was determined every week from May 11 to September 7, 2002. Soil moisture content at point bar locations was significantly greater than that of floodplain locations for the majority of the growing season. As percent soil moisture declined over the season, planted willow cuttings began to show signs of moisture stress. Willow planting survival was significantly higher for point bar locations than floodplain locations. It appears soil moisture is an important factor influencing the survival of planted willow cuttings.

Technical Abstract: Willows (Salix sp.) are an important plant species for maintaining function (e.g. streambank stability, fish habitat, moderating solar inputs) in many riparian systems. Re-establishment of willows in depleted communities is dependent on an adequate knowledge of the environmental factors necessary for growth and survival of willow cuttings. Our objectives were to determine the influence of 1.) morphological location (point bar vs. floodplain) of planting, and 2.) soil moisture content, on growth and survival of willow cuttings. The study area was located along a Rosgen C-type channel located in a mid-elevation meadow system in Grant County, Oregon. The only willows on site prior to our study were scattered, old willow clumps with very limited annual production. Willow cuttings were planted within 12, 25 x 12m grazing exclosures constructed along inside turns within the study reach. Cuttings were taken from mature Booth's willow shrubs in April of 2002 and placed in cold storage (0oC) for 30 days. Cuttings were removed from cold storage and soaked in water for 2 days prior to planting in early May. Forty cuttings were planted to a depth of 40cm at both the floodplain and point bar locations within each exclosure. Survival of cuttings was assessed in June and August of 2002. Gravimetric soil moisture at 15 and 30cm was determined every week from May 11 to September 7, 2002. Soil moisture content at point bar locations was significantly greater than that of floodplain locations for the majority of the growing season. As percent soil moisture declined over the season, planted willow cuttings began to show signs of moisture stress. Willow planting survival was significantly higher for point bar locations than floodplain locations. It appears soil moisture is an important factor influencing the survival of planted willow cuttings.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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