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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Collection of Adult Flatheaded Borers Using Multicolored Traps

Authors
item Oliver, Jason - TENNESSEE STATE UNIV
item Fare, Donna
item Youssef, Nadeer - TENNESSEE STATE UNIV
item Klengeman, William - UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE

Submitted to: Southern Nursery Association Proceedings
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 2, 2003
Publication Date: December 15, 2004
Citation: Oliver, J., Fare, D.C., Youssef, N., Klengeman, W. 2004. Collection of adult flatheaded borers using multicolored traps. Southern Nursery Association Proceedings. 48:193-199.

Interpretive Summary: Three common wood boring insect problems in nursery and landscape plantings include the flatheaded appletree borer, the Pacific flatheaded borer, and the bronze birch borer. A recent field survey determined that about 8.4 percent of production red maples had signs of borer damage within 2 years of transplanting. Monitoring borers with traps has been difficult, because adult borers do not readily respond to commonly used lure attractants that are successful with other wood boring insects. The objectives of this study were to develop an effective survey trap to monitor borer activity and develop models to help nursery producers effectively manage borer activity. Sticky traps that simulated young trees were colored blue, gray, green, red, white, or yellow and were highly effective capturing multiple species of borers, including the flatheaded appletree borer. During the two year evaluation, borers displayed a distinct preference for red colored traps in which 35 percent of all borers were trapped. This study determined that a colored sticky trap simulating a young tree silhouette could be an effective and simple tool to monitor the flight activity of multiple buprestid species near a nursery-growing area.

Technical Abstract: The metallic wood-boring beetles, Buprestids, are unpredictable and often significant pests of woody plants. Three that are common problems in nursery and landscape plantings include the flatheaded appletree borer, Chrysobothris femorata, Olivier, the Pacific flatheaded borer, Chrysobothris mali, Horn, and the bronze birch borer, Agrilus anxius, Gory. A recent field survey determined that about 8.4 percent of production red maples had signs of buprestid damage within 2 years of transplanting. Monitoring buprestids with traps has been difficult, because adults do not readily respond to commonly used lure attractants that are successful with other wood-boring insects. The objectives of this study were to develop an effective survey trap to monitor buprestid activity and develop growing degree day models to help nursery producers effectively manage borer activity. Sticky traps that simulated young trees were colored blue, gray, green, red, white, or yellow and were highly effective capturing multiple species of borers, including the flatheaded appletree borer. In both 2001 and 2002, buprestids displayed a distinct preference for red colored traps, which resulted in about 35% of all buprestids trapped. This study determined that a colored sticky trap simulating a young tree silhouette could be an effective and simple tool to monitor the flight activity of multiple buprestid species near a nursery growing area.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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