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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Towards Control of Mycoplasma Gallisepticum-Induced Mycoplasmosis in Poultry

Authors
item Evans, Jeff
item Collier, Stephanie
item Branton, Scott

Submitted to: Feedinfo News Service
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: September 23, 2003
Publication Date: September 26, 2003
Citation: Evans, J.D., Collier, S.D., Branton, S.L. 2003. Towards control of mycoplasma gallisepticum-induced mycoplasmosis in poultry. Feedinfo News Service (www.feedinfo.com).

Interpretive Summary: Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major pathogen of poultry species world-wide. MG is the etiologic agent of chronic respiratory disease in chickens and infectious sinusitis in turkeys. As MG is the most economically significant Mycoplasma species affecting poultry, means of controlling MG must be developed. To this end, MG has been and continues to be a major focus of the USDA-ARS Poultry Research Unit at Mississippi State, MS. Thus far, some of the important research findings regarding MG from the Unit include the optimization of current vaccination protocols and the development of a vaccinator for the mass treatment of layer chickens, both of which have been successfully applied to the poultry industry. In addition, research is underway to develop a novel recombinant vaccine for the control of MG.

Technical Abstract: Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) is a major pathogen of poultry species world-wide. MG is the etiologic agent of chronic respiratory disease in chickens and infectious sinusitis in turkeys and has been described as the most economically significant Mycoplasma species affecting poultry. In the U.S. alone, annual losses attributed to MG exceed $100 million. Therefore, control of MG has been and continues to be a major focus of the USDA-ARS Poultry Research Unit at Mississippi State, MS. Thus far, some of the important research findings regarding MG from the Unit include the optimization of current vaccination protocols and the development of a self-propelled, constant speed vaccinator for mass vaccination of layer chickens. Further, research is currently underway to develop a novel recombinant vaccine which is efficacious, safe, and applicable to all poultry.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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