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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Tillage and Compost Affect Yield of Corn, Soybean, and Wheat

Authors
item Singer, Jeremy
item Kohler, Keith
item Liebman, M - IA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Richard, T - IA STATE UNVERSITY
item Cambardella, Cynthia
item Buhler, D - MICHIGAN STATE UNIV

Submitted to: ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meeting Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 6, 2003
Publication Date: November 6, 2003
Citation: SINGER, J.W., KOHLER, K.A., LIEBMAN, M., RICHARD, T.L., CAMBARDELLA, C.A., BUHLER, D.D. TILLAGE AND COMPOST AFFECT YIELD OF CORN, SOYBEAN, AND WHEAT. ASA-CSSA-SSSA ANNUAL MEETING ABSTRACTS. 2003. CD-ROM. MADISON, WI.

Technical Abstract: Applying organic matter amendments to cropland reduces requirements for synthetic fertilizer and may eliminate yield differences between conventional and minimum tillage. The objectives of this research were to determine how tillage and composted swine (Sus scrofa L.) manure affected yield of corn (Zea mays L.), soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr], and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and soil concentrations of organic matter (OM), P, and K, using a C-based compost application criterion. A corn-soybean-wheat/clover (Trifolium spp.) rotation, in all phases, was initiated in 1998 in plots that had been managed with moldboard plow (MP), chisel plow, or no-till since 1988. Moldboard and chisel plow increased corn yield in the first year of the study versus no-till. Thereafter, tillage did not affect yield on plots that received compost. Tillage by compost interactions during the last two years of the study increased no-till compost yield eleven percent versus no compost. Soybean yield was similar in no-till and chisel compost plots during the study period and between MP and no-till in three of four years. Tillage by compost interactions were observed in two of the four years that increased no-till compost yield nine percent versus no compost. Averaged across all crops and tillage, compost amended soil had 63 versus 56 g kg-1 OM in no compost. Corn and soybean producers can enhance yield with multiple compost applications and eliminate yield differences between conventional and no-till systems. Nevertheless, compost application for soil OM enhancement must be balanced with P input to minimize the potential for excessive soil P accumulation.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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