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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Trap (Target Region Amplification Polymorphism) Technique and Its Application to Crop Genomics

Authors
item Hu, Jinguo
item Miller, Jerry
item Xu, Steven
item Faris, Justin
item Miklas, Phillip
item Ochoa, Oswaldo - UC DAVIS, CA
item Truco, Maria-Jose - UC DAVIS, CA
item Berville, Andre - INRA, MONTPELLIER, FRANCE
item Vick, Brady

Submitted to: Plant and Animal Genome VX Conference Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 1, 2003
Publication Date: January 10, 2004
Citation: Hu, J., Miller, J.F., Xu, S.S., Faris, J.D., Miklas, P.N., Ochoa, O., Truco, M., Berville, A., Vick, B.A. 2004. Trap (target region amplification polymorphism) technique and its application to crop genomics [abstract]. Plant and Animal Genome XII Abstracts, January 10-14, 2004, San Diego, CA. W169. p. 47.

Interpretive Summary: The newly developed TRAP (Target Region Amplification Polymorphism) marker technique (Hu and Vick 2003, Plant Mol Bio Reporter V21(3):) focuses on bridging the existing DNA sequence information with crop traits of agronomical importance. It uses three primers in PCR to detect polymorphism, the fixed primer is designed against the sequence of annotated EST and two arbitrary primers, each labeled with a different fluorescent dye for autodetection. The number of fragments amplified by each PCR is over 100 with 50 to 900 bp in length and the intensity varies but independent from fragment length. The TRAP has been applied to germplasm characterization, genetic variability assessment among cultivars and genome mapping of various crop species. The technical detail will be discussed and the results obtained in wheat, bean, lettuce and sunflower will be presented.

Technical Abstract: The newly developed TRAP (Target Region Amplification Polymorphism) marker technique (Hu and Vick 2003, Plant Mol Bio Reporter V21(3):) focuses on bridging the existing DNA sequence information with crop traits of agronomical importance. It uses three primers in PCR to detect polymorphism, the fixed primer is designed against the sequence of annotated EST and two arbitrary primers, each labeled with a different fluorescent dye for autodetection. The number of fragments amplified by each PCR is over 100 with 50 to 900 bp in length and the intensity varies but independent from fragment length. The TRAP has been applied to germplasm characterization, genetic variability assessment among cultivars and genome mapping of various crop species. The technical detail will be discussed and the results obtained in wheat, bean, lettuce and sunflower will be presented.

Last Modified: 4/15/2014
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