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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Resistance of Glycine Species and Various Cultivated Legumes to the Soybean Aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae)

Authors
item Hill, Curtis - UNIV OF ILLINOIS
item Li, Yan - UNIV OF ILLINOIS
item Hartman, Glen

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 20, 2003
Publication Date: February 5, 2004
Citation: Hill, C.B., Li, Y. Hartman, G.L. 2004. Resistance of Glycine species and various cultivated legumes to the soybean aphid (Homoptera: Aphididae). Journal of Enconomic Entomology. 97:1071-1077.

Interpretive Summary: The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines, is a new pest of soybean in the midwest. A native of Asia, it has become widespread on soybean in midwest since it was first identified in the Midwest in 2000. Aphid colonization on various legume hosts was compared. Aphid colonization occurred on perennial species in the genus Glycine. No colonization occurred on five different legumes species and those species appeared to be non-hosts of A. glycines. Colonization was limited or aphids were transient on three other legumes whereas 180 aphids per plant occurred on susceptible Williams 82. Six G. soja accessions, the annual progenitor of soybean, were as resistant to A. glycines as resistant soybean accessions. Results of this study indicated that A. glycines preferred over the primary hosts G. max and G. soja; however, its host range may include other leguminous species. These new resistant G. soja sources may be used to breed A. glycines resistant soybean cultivars, especially if they represent novel sources of resistance not found in G. max. The results of this information will be used by breeders and entomologist.

Technical Abstract: The soybean aphid, Aphis glycines Matsumara, is a new pest of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] in North America. A native of Asia, it has become widespread on soybean in North America since it was first identified in the Midwest in 2000. Rhamnus L. spp. (buckthorn) are the primary hosts of A. glycines and soybean is known as a secondary host. There is limited information about the secondary host range of A. glycines. Aphid colonization on various legume hosts was compared in choice experiments. Aphid colonization occurred on species in the genus Glycine Wild . No colonization occurred on accessions of Lablab purpureus (L.) Sweet, Lens culinaris Medik, Pisum sativum L., Vicia L. spp., and Vigna Savi spp. Those species appeared to be non-hosts of A. glycines. Colonization was limited or aphids were transient on Phaseolus L., Trifolium L., and Medicago L. spp., as few aphids were counted compared to 180 aphids per plant on susceptible G. max 'Williams 82'. There were significant differences in aphid colonization among M. truncatula accessions with populations ranging from 7 to 97 aphids per plant. Six G. soja Sieb. & Zucc. accessions were as resistant to A. glycines as resistant G. max accessions; these may represent novel sources of A. glycines resistance. Antibiosis was found to play a large role in the expression of resistance in three of the G. soja accessions that were evaluated in a non-choice test. These new resistant G. soja sources may be used to breed A. glycines resistant soybean cultivars, especially if they represent novel sources of resistance not found in G. max. Results of this study indicated that A. glycines preferred the secondary hosts G. max and G. soja; however, its secondary host range may include other leguminous species. Therefore A. glycines did not appear to have a highly restricted monophagous secondary host range.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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