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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Response of Commercially Developed Soybean Cultivars and Ancestral Soybean Lines to Fujsarium Solani F. Sp. Glycines

Authors
item Muller, D - UNIV OF ILLINOIS
item Hartman, Glen
item Nelson, Randall
item Pedersen, Wayne - UNIV OF ILLINOIS

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 4, 2004
Publication Date: November 1, 2004
Citation: Muller, D.S., Hartman, G.L., Nelson, R.L., Pedersen, W.L. 2004. Response of Commercially Developed Soybean Cultivars and Ancestral Soybean Lines to Fujsarium Solani f. sp. Glycines. Plant Disease. Paper No. 1-437.

Interpretive Summary: Sudden death syndrome of soybean is caused by the soilborne fungus Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines and has been identified in most soybean producing regions of the United States. The objectives of this study were to evaluate U.S. soybean cultivars (conventional and Roundup Ready) to identify sources of resistance that could be used immediately by growers and soybean breeders to manage sudden death syndrome, and to evaluate ancestral lines of U.S. cultivars and other lines found in the pedigrees of public cultivars reported to have some resistance. Over a 3-year period, 2335 publicly and privately developed soybean entries were inoculated and evaluated for their response to F. solani f. sp. glycines under greenhouse conditions. Thirty-eight entries were identified with moderate levels of resistance with no differences between the Roundup Ready and conventional cultivars. Nine ancestral lines and 12 cultivars or experimental lines had low disease ratings. The importance of this research is that it potentially has discovered new sources of resistance to this soilborne fungus which could be useful for breeders to incorporate this resistance in new varieties with higher levels of resistance to this pathogen.

Technical Abstract: Sudden death syndrome, caused by Fusarium solani f. sp. glycines, has caused severe damage to soybean production in recent years. One way to control sudden death syndrome is with resistant cultivars. Over a 3-year period, 2335 publicly and privately developed soybean entries were inoculated and evaluated for their response to F. solani f. sp. glycines under greenhouse conditions. The entries were compared to the susceptible check, Great Lakes 3302 (GL3302), and the moderately resistant checks, plant introductions (PI) 520733 and 567374. Thirty-eight entries were identified with moderate levels of resistance. Based on foliar ratings, there were no differences (P<0.05) between the Roundup Ready and conventional cultivars. Ninety ancestral lines that represent 99% of the genes in modern U.S. cultivars and 55 lines found in the pedigrees of public cultivars reported to have some resistance were evaluated for their response to F. solani f. sp. glycines. Nine ancestral lines (Aoda , Kim, Jackson, Sioux, Mammoth Yellow, T117, PI 171450, PI 54615-1, and PI 71506) and 12 cultivars or experimental lines (Ina, D83-3349, LN98-4340, LN83-2356, Hartwig, Harosoy, Bedford, Merit, Cutler, Calland, Hill, and Evans) had disease ratings not significantly different (P<0.05) from PI 520733 or PI 567374. PI 54610, a putative ancestral line, was also found to be moderately resistant.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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