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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A Comparative Study of Nutrient Management Tools for Dairy Farms in New York, Wisconsin and Elsewhere

Authors
item Powell, J Mark
item Ketterings, Quirine - CORNELL UNIVERSITY
item Adams, Leah-Nell - UW-MADISON
item Rasmussen, Caroline - UW-MADISON

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 5, 2003
Publication Date: December 5, 2003
Citation: POWELL, J.M., KETTERINGS, Q., ADAMS, L., RASMUSSEN, C. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT TOOLS FOR DAIRY FARMS IN NEW YORK, WISCONSIN AND ELSEWHERE. MEETING ABSTRACT. 2003.

Technical Abstract: Software has been developed to address a range of nutrient management decisions, including optimizing dairy herd and feed management, manure and fertilizer management, and assisting land use planners in dairy herd expansion, etc. The objectives of this 6-part video seminar series was to (1) present and review the science and methodology supporting the major nutrient management tools being used in New York, Wisconsin and elsewhere; (2) exchange information and share ideas for tool improvement, expansion, and to provide a basis for possible future collaboration between modelers in New York, Wisconsin and elsewhere; (3) identify the gaps in knowledge about nutrient management planning and identify future research and extension needs; and (4) provide content for a published proceedings that will systematically catalog tool criteria, providing a reference for consultants, researchers, educators, policy makers and other professionals that generate knowledge and provide assistance to dairy farmers on issues related to agricultural nutrient management. The video series with sites at Cornell University and University of Wisconsin covered 8 nutrient management tools: DAFOSYM; PALMS; CROPWARE; N-cycle; Modified Yardstick; SNAP; WI P-Index; and CNCPS. Presentations by tool developers provided an overview on the scale and tool focus, tool application, knowledge and data transferability, tool outputs, tool limitations, if the tool has been useful in reducing nutrient load to the environment, if it has been useful in meeting current and future regulatory requirements, and the future plans for tool. Each presentation was followed by prepared comments on the strengths and shortcomings of the tool by an individual who used the tool. All presentations are available at http://www.dfrc.wisc.edu/powell/seminarSeries.html

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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