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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Congenital Polycystic Kidney in a White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus Virginianus)

Authors
item Palmer, Mitchell
item Carpenter, J - IOWA STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 12, 2004
Publication Date: September 20, 2004
Citation: Palmer, M.V., Carpenter, J. 2004. Congenital polycystic kidney in a white-tailed deer (odocoileus virginianus). Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation. 16(5):475-477.

Interpretive Summary: Renal cystic diseases comprise a heterogenous group of hereditary, developmental and acquired disorders. In man, polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, being more common than sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, Huntington's chorea and hemophilia. Polycystic kidney disease is characterized by progressive enlargement of the kidneys due to numerous expansile cysts and ultimately leads to renal failure. In humans, PKD is heritable and recognized in at least 2 genetically distinguishable forms; infantile or autosomal recessive PKD (ARPKD) and adult or autosomal dominant PKD (ADPKD). Here we describe polycystic kidney and liver disease in a stillborn white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawn. The presentation and morphology of this case are most similar to autosomal recessive polycystic disease in humans.

Technical Abstract: Polycystic kidney and liver disease was seen in a stillborn white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawn. Bilaterally enlarged kidneys were characterized by severe dilatation of all renal tubules. Glomeruli were reduced in number, small and located within a dilated Bowman's capsule. The liver was characterized by marked periportal fibrosis, biliary hyperplasia and bile duct ectasia with dilated ducts containing inspissated bile. The presentation and morphology of this case are most similar to autosomal recessive polycystic disease in humans.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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