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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Impact of Sprinkler Irrigation Amount and Rotation on Peanut Yield

Authors
item Lamb, Marshall
item Masters, M -
item Rowland, Diane
item Sorensen, Ronald
item Zhu, Heping
item Blankenship, Paul
item Butts, Christopher

Submitted to: Peanut Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 7, 2004
Publication Date: August 20, 2005
Citation: Lamb, M.C., Rowland, D., Sorensen, R.B., Zhu, H., Blankenship, P.D., Butts, C.L. 2005. Impact of sprinkler irrigation amount and rotation on peanut yield. Peanut Science. 31:108-113

Interpretive Summary: Irrigation is an essential to maintain crop yield, quality, and income during most years in peanut producing regions. Producers have realized this as irrigated acreage for crop production in Georgia increased from 175,000 acres in 1970 to 1,450,000 in 2000. However, demand for water resources due to urban expansion and interstate litigation coupled with repeated drought are collectively threatening irrigation water supplies in Southeast U.S. peanut producing regions. Next to land, abundant water for irrigation is arguably the most important natural resource in production agriculture. Data and information on the impact of irrigation in a cropping systems framework is limited. A study was conducted during the 2001-2003 crop years to quantify the impact of reduced irrigation amounts and different crop rotation sequences including peanut, corn, and cotton. Irrigated peanut yield was significantly than non-irrigated yield. The affect of crop rotation on peanut yield was also significant. One year out of peanuts, in either corn or cotton, significantly increased irrigated peanut yield over continuous peanut. Two years out of peanuts, in either corn or cotton, resulted in an even larger significant increase irrigated peanut yield over continuous peanut. In non-irrigated peanuts, crop rotation sequence had less affect on pod yield than did precipitation during the growing season.

Technical Abstract: Irrigated acreage for crop production in Georgia increased from 175,000 acres in 1970 to 1,450,000 in 2000. The majority of the increase was planted in peanuts, corn, and cotton. In 1970, these crops accounted for 100,000 of Georgia's irrigated acreage and in 2000 these crops totaled 1,150,000 irrigated acres. Simultaneously, demand for water resources due to urban expansion and interstate litigation coupled with repeated drought are collectively threatening irrigation water supplies in Southeast U.S. peanut producing regions. A study was conducted during the 2001-2003 crop years to quantify the impact of reduced irrigation amounts and different crop rotation sequences including peanut, corn, and cotton. On average, irrigated peanut pod yield was significantly increased by 808 lb a-1 compared to non-irrigated yield. The affect of crop rotation on peanut yield was also significant. One year out of peanuts, in either corn or cotton, significantly increased irrigated peanut yield an average of 956 lb a-1 over continuous peanut. Two years out of peanuts, in either corn or cotton, significantly increased irrigated peanut yield an average of 2081 lb a-1 over continuous peanut. In non-irrigated peanuts, crop rotation sequence had less affect on pod yield than did precipitation during the growing season.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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