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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of halosulfuron on weed control in commercial honeydew crops

Authors
item Brandenberger, L. - OSU, STILLWATER, OK
item Talbert, R.E. - UNIV OF AR, FAYETTEVILLE
item Wiendenfeld, R.P. - TEXAS A&M, WESLACO, TX
item Shrefler, J.W. - OSU, LANE, OK
item Webber, Charles
item Malik, M.S. - UNIV OF AR, FAYETTEVILLE

Submitted to: Weed Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 3, 2004
Publication Date: April 1, 2005
Citation: Brandenberger, L., Talbert, R., Wiendenfeld, R., Shrefler, J., Webber III, C.L., Malik, M. 2005. Effects of halosulfuron on weed control in commercial honeydew crops. Weed Technology. 19:346-350.

Interpretive Summary: Yellow nutsedge, tumble pigweed, and golden crownbeard are serious weeds in cucurbit crops (honeydew, watermelons, cucumbers, squash, etc.) in the Southern Plains region. These weeds reproduce prolifically, grow rapidly, and compete aggressively. Control of nutsedge in cucurbit crops is often limited to cultivation and hand weeding because few effective herbicides are registered for this crop group. Although many weed species are controlled by black plastic mulch on planting beds, yellow nutsedge readily punctures plastic mulch and aggressively competes with the crop. Halosulfuron is a systemic, sulfonylurea herbicide that is being developed for the vegetable crop market. Halosulfuron has both preemergent and postemergent activity on several weed species and several cucurbits have shown tolerance to it. In the past, control of yellow and purple nutsedge has required different herbicides for each species, however both species are controlled by halosulfuron. The purpose of these studies was to determine crop safety and effectiveness of halosulfuron when used in plastic-culture melon crops for control of yellow nutsedge, tumble pigweed, and golden crownbeard. Studies were conducted at five sites during a three-year period in Oklahoma, Texas, and Arkansas to determine the effectiveness and safety of halosulfuron in honeydew production. Halosulfuron applied postemergence at 26.3 to 78.8 g ai/ha resulted in 64-73% control of yellow nutsedge, 99-100% control of golden crownbeard, and 84-95% control of tumble pigweed. Control of nutsedge increased to its highest level after 4 to 6 weeks, golden crownbeard and tumble pigweed control increased to their highest levels after 2 to 4 weeds, respectively. Crop safety varied among studies but did not exceed 13% injury to the honeydew crops. Based upon the results of these studies, the authors conclude that halosulfuron will provide a much-needed tool for the control of yellow nutsedge, golden crownbeard, and tumble pigweed for commercial honeydew production.

Technical Abstract: Yellow nutsedge (Cyperus esculentus), pigweed species (Amaranthus species), and golden crownbeard (Verbesina encelioide) are serious weeds in cucurbit crops in the Southern Plains region. Control of nutsedge in cucurbit crops is often limited to cultivation and hand weeding because few effective herbicides are registered for this crop group. Although many weed species are controlled by black plastic mulch on planting beds, yellow nutsedge readily punctures plastic mulch and aggressively competes with the crop. Halosulfuron is a systemic, sulfonylurea herbicide that is being developed for the vegetable crop market. Halosulfuron has both preemergent and postemergent activity on several weed species and several cucurbits have shown tolerance to it. In the past, control of yellow and purple nutsedge (Cyperus rotundus) has required different herbicides for each species, however both species are controlled by halosulfuron. The purpose of these studies was to determine crop safety and effectiveness of halosulfuron when used in plastic-culture melon crops for control of yellow nutsedge, tumble pigweed (Amaranthu albus), and golden crownbeard. Studies were conducted at five sites during a three-year period in Oklahoma, Texas, and Arkansas to determine the effectiveness and safety of halosulfuron in honeydew (Cucumus melo) crops. Halosulfuron applied postemergence at 26.3 to 78.8 g ai/ha resulted in 64-73% control of yellow nutsedge, 99-100% control of golden crownbeard, and 84-95% control of tumble pigweed. Control of nutsedge increased to its highest level after 4 to 6 wk, golden crownbeard and tumble pigweed efficacy increased to their highest levels after 2 to 4 wk, respectively. Crop safety varied among studies but did not exceed 13% injury to the honeydew crops. Based upon the results of these studies, the authors conclude that halosulfuron will provide a much-needed tool for the control of yellow nutsedge, golden crownbeard, and tumble pigweed for commercial honeydew production.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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