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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Antibacterial Activities of Naturally Occurring Compounds Against Antibiotic-Resistant Micrococcus Luteus Atcc 10240a

Authors
item Friedman, Mendel
item Buick, Robert - DEPT. OF AGR. NO. IRELAND
item Elliot, Christopher - DEPT. OF AG. NO. IRELAND

Submitted to: Journal of Food Protection
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 30, 2004
Publication Date: August 1, 2004
Citation: Friedman, M., Buick, R., Elliot, C. 2004. Antibacterial activities of naturally occurring compounds against antibiotic-resistant micrococcus luteus atcc 10240a. Journal of Food Protection. v. 67 p. 1774-1778

Interpretive Summary: After demonstrating the lack of effectiveness of standard antibiotics against acquired antibiotic resistance of Micorococcus luteus (ATCC 10240A), we showed that seven naturally occurring substances were bactericidal against this bacterium, typical of nonpahtogenic strains that may be found as contaminants of food and feed. Since the compounds evaluated in the present study were previously shown to be active against antibiotic-resistant pathogenic strains of B. cereus, E. coli, and S. aureus, future studies of the effectiveness of new antimicrobial agents with the resistant M. luteus strain may predict their effectiveness against resistant pathogenic bacteria.

Technical Abstract: After demonstrating the lack of effectiveness of standard antibiotics against acquired antibiotic resistance of Micorococcus luteus (ATCC 10240A), we showed that seven naturally occurring substances were bactericidal against this bacterium, typical of strains that may be found as contaminants of food and feed. Exposure of the M. luteus strain to a dilution series of the test compounds revealed the following approximate order of antibacterial activities: carvacrol > oregano oil > thyme oil » cinnamon oil > perillaldehyde > dopamine > b-resorcyclic acid. Some of the test substances may provide alternatives to standard antibiotics that can be effective against antibiotic-resistant bacteria in foods and feeds. The possible significance of the results for food and feed microbiology is discussed.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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