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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Landscape Features and Spatial Distribution of Adult Northern Corn Rootworms (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in the South Dakota Areawide Management Site

Authors
item French, Bryan
item Beckler, Amber - FORMER ARS EMPLOYEE
item Chandler, Laurence

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 10, 2004
Publication Date: December 1, 2004
Citation: French, B.W., Beckler, A., Chandler, L.D. 2004. Landscape features and spatial distribution of adult northern corn rootworms (coleoptera: chrysomelidae) in the south dakota areawide management site. Journal of Economic Entomology 97(6): 1943-1957.

Interpretive Summary: The northern corn rootworm is a serious pest of corn in the U.S. Corn Belt. In order to supplement the population control tactics of the Areawide Pest Management Program in Brookings, South Dakota, we used Geographical Information Systems to examine the spatial relationships of northern corn rootworm populations with habitat structure, soil texture, and elevation. We created maps of northern corn rootworm population densities from georeferenced emergence and post-emergence traps placed in cornfields from 1997 - 2001. For each year, these maps were overlaid with vegetation, soil, and elevation maps to search for quantitative relationships between pest numbers and landscape structure. Through visual interpretation and correlation analysis, shifts in landscape structure, such as size, number, and arrangement of patches were shown to associate with northern corn rootworm population abundance and distribution in varying degrees. Northern corn rootworms were found in greater proportions than expected on loam and silty clay loam soils, and on elevations between 500 m ' 509 m. An understanding of the interactions between northern corn rootworm population dynamics and landscape variables provides information to pest managers, which can be used to identify patterns in the landscape that promote high insect population density patches to improve pest management strategies.

Technical Abstract: The northern corn rootworm, Diabrotica barberi Smith and Lawrence (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), creates economic and environmental concerns in the Corn Belt region of the United States. In order to supplement the population control tactics of the Areawide Pest Management Program in Brookings, South Dakota, Geographical Information Systems were used to examine the spatial relationships from 1997 to 2001 between northern corn rootworm population dynamics, and habitat structure, soil texture, and elevation. Using the inverse distance weighted interpolation technique, northern corn rootworm population density maps were created from georeferenced emergence and post-emergence traps placed in maize (Zea mays L.) fields. For each year, these maps were overlaid with vegetation, soil, and elevation maps to search for quantitative relationships between pest numbers and landscape structure. Through visual interpretation and correlation analysis, shifts in landscape structure, such as size, number, and arrangement of patches were shown to associate with northern corn rootworm population abundance and distribution in varying degrees. Northern corn rootworms were found in greater proportions than expected on loam and silty clay loam soils, and on elevations between 500 m ' 509 m. An understanding of the interactions between northern corn rootworm population dynamics and landscape variables provides information to pest managers, which can be used to identify patterns in the landscape that promote high insect population density patches to improve pest management strategies.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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