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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Development of Molecular Strategies to Control Rice Blast and Sheath Blight Diseases

Authors
item Jia, Yulin
item Singh, Pratibha - UA RREC
item Wang, Zhonghua - ZHEJIANG WANLI UNIV, PRC
item Crowley, Eugenia
item Wamishe, Yeshi - UA RREC
item Redus, Marc - USDA,ARS,NRRC DEC.
item Rutger, J

Submitted to: Southern Association of Agricultural Scientists Bulletin of Biochemistry and Biotechnology
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 24, 2004
Publication Date: December 24, 2004
Citation: Jia, Y., Singh, P., Wang, Z., Winston, E.M., Wamishe, Y., Redus, M., Rutger, J.N. 2004. Development of molecular strategies to control rice blast and sheath blight diseases. Southern Association of Agricultural Scientists Bulletin of Biochemistry and Biotechnology. 17:20-34.

Interpretive Summary: We described progress on the development of molecular strategies to control rice blast and sheath blight diseases. Rice blast caused by the airborne fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea and sheath blight caused by the soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani are the two most devastating diseases that threaten rice production worldwide. In the US, use of major resistance genes is one of the most effective methods to control rice blast disease. While no major resistance genes to sheath blight have been discovered in cultivated rice, minor resistance sources have been reported. The use of tolerant cultivars along with integrated cultural practices, including the application of pesticides, has been effective in controlling sheath blight disease. Improvement of blast resistance in rice has benefited from the cloning and characterization of the Pi-ta blast resistance gene and the corresponding fungal avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Detailed analysis of allelic variation at the Pi-ta locus has allowed the development of three dominant and one codominant markers that will facilitate breeding of blast resistance in the US through marker assisted selection. A better understanding of molecular mechanisms underpinning host-parasite interaction was obtained from a detailed study of population biology of M. grisea and R. solani isolates. Useful genetic stocks of Oryza sativa for functional genomic studies were obtained. Mechanisms of rice resistance to both hemibiotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens have been studied at the molecular level. Resulting knowledge will be used for developing genetic control method for creating an environmentally benign rice production system.

Technical Abstract: Rice blast caused by the airborne fungal pathogen Magnaporthe grisea and sheath blight caused by the soilborne fungal pathogen Rhizoctonia solani are the two most devastating diseases that threaten rice production worldwide. In the US, use of major resistance genes is one of the most effective methods to control rice blast disease. While no major resistance genes to sheath blight have been discovered in cultivated rice, minor resistance sources have been reported. The use of tolerant cultivars along with integrated cultural practices, including the application of pesticides, has been effective in controlling sheath blight disease. Improvement of blast resistance in rice has benefited from the cloning and characterization of the Pi-ta blast resistance gene and the corresponding fungal avirulence gene AVR-Pita. Detailed analysis of allelic variation at the Pi-ta locus has allowed the development of three dominant and one codominant markers that will facilitate breeding of blast resistance in the US through marker assisted selection. A better understanding of molecular mechanisms underpinning host-parasite interaction was obtained from a detailed study of population biology of M. grisea and R. solani isolates. Useful genetic stocks of Oryza sativa for functional genomic studies were obtained. Mechanisms of rice resistance to both hemibiotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens have been studied at the molecular level. Progress on the development of molecular strategies to control rice blast and sheath blight diseases is described.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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